Iranian New Zealander

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Iranian New Zealanders
Total population

2,895 Iran-born (2006)[1]

8,000 (Iranian embassy 2010 estimate)[citation needed]
Regions with significant populations
Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch
Languages
New Zealand English, Persian, languages of Iran
Religion
Shia Islam, Irreligion, Atheism, Bahá'í, Christian, Atheist, Judaism, Zoroastrianism
Related ethnic groups
Iranians, Persian people, Azeris

Iranian New Zealanders (Persian: ایرانی نیوزیلندی‎), informally known as Persian Kiwis, are New Zealanders of Iranian national background or descent who are expatriates or permanent immigrants, and their descendants. The 2006 census found that 2,895 New Zealanders were born in Iran, although the figure of Iranian New Zealanders will be higher than this as many of them are born in another country, while many New Zealand-born children of Iranians may consider themselves to be Iranian New Zealanders.[citation needed]

Migration history[edit]

Most Iranian New Zealanders came to New Zealand after the Iranian Revolution in 1979. The community expanded in the early 1980s and 1990s during the Iran–Iraq War and its aftermath. However most Iranian emigrates since 2010 are professional migrants whom revived their resident permit through emigration programs.

Demography[edit]

The majority of Iranian New Zealanders are of Persian background, but there are also Azeris and Kurds.[citation needed] Around half of Iranians in New Zealand are Muslim, but those of Christian background are also present.[2] Among Iranian migrants there are also Bahá'ís who had been persecuted for their religion in Iran.[3] From 1987 to 1989, 142 Bahá'ís arrived in New Zealand as refugees.[4]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

Iranians in New Zealand:[1]
Year Persons
1881 2
1951 20
2001 1,980
2006 2,895

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Veitch, James; Tinawi, Dalia, "Middle Eastern peoples: Facts and figures", Te Ara: The Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, Ministry for Culture and Heritage, ISBN 978-0-478-18451-8 
  2. ^ Veitch, James; Tinawi, Dalia, "Middle Eastern peoples: Other Middle Eastern peoples", Te Ara: The Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, Ministry for Culture and Heritage, ISBN 978-0-478-18451-8 
  3. ^ Prasad, Vanita (2010-12-09), "Baha'i marchers celebrate freedom", Stuff.co.nz, retrieved 2011-09-15 
  4. ^ "New Zealand refugee timeline", Stuff.co.nz, 2009-06-20, retrieved 2011-09-15 

External links[edit]