Ireland at the 1924 Summer Olympics

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Ireland at the Olympic Games

Flag of Ireland
IOC code  IRL
NOC Olympic Council of Ireland
Website www.olympicsport.ie
At the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris
Competitors
Medals Gold
0
Silver
0
Bronze
0
Total
0
Olympic history (summary)
Summer Games
Winter Games
Other related appearances
Great Britain (1896–1920)

Ireland, then known as the Irish Free State, competed as an independent nation for the first time at the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris, France.

The Irish Free State national football team made their international debut at these Olympics. The football tournament was decided on a knockout basis with 12 teams entering the first round. The 6 winners then joined another 10 teams, including the Irish Free State, in the second round. On May 28 at the Stade Olympique, the Irish Free State beat Bulgaria 1-0 with Paddy Duncan scoring the only goal. As a result of this win they qualified for the quarter-finals. On June 2 they played the Netherlands at the Stade de Paris in Saint-Ouen but lost 2-1 after extra-time. However, the following day, before returning home, the team played one more game, beating Estonia, 3-1 in a friendly at the Stade Olympique.

Contemporary records, such as the Football Association of Ireland annual report, regarded these three internationals as full internationals, despite featuring amateur teams. After the 1960s these games were reclassified as amateur internationals. However in June 1999 FIFA declared that early Olympic internationals could be considered as full internationals.

Aquatics[edit]

Water polo[edit]

Ireland made its debut Olympic water polo appearance.

Roster
First round
  • Bye
Quarterfinals
Czechoslovakia  4 – 2  Ireland Piscine des Tourelles

Athletics[edit]

Eleven athletes represented Ireland in 1924. It was the nation's debut appearance in the sport as well as the Games.

Ranks given are within the heat.

Athlete Event Heats Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Result Rank Result Rank Result Rank Result Rank
Paddy Bermingham Discus throw N/A 40.42 4 Did not advance
John Clarke 10000 m N/A Did not finish
Sean Kelly 3000 m steeplechase N/A Unknown 7 Did not advance
Sean Lavan 200 m 23.2 1 Q Unknown 4 Did not advance
400 m 51.2 2 Q 49.8 4 Did not advance
Norman MacEachern 800 m N/A Unknown 2 Q 1:58.3 5 Did not advance
William Lowe 100 m Unknown 4 Did not advance
200 m 23.0 2 Q Unknown 5 Did not advance
John O'Connor Triple jump N/A 13.99 5 Did not advance
John O'Grady Shot put N/A 12.75 8 Did not advance
John Ryan 10000 m N/A Did not finish
Cross country N/A Did not finish
William Shanahan Decathlon N/A 5426.680 19
Larry Stanley High jump N/A 1.80 4 Did not advance

Boxing[edit]

Seven boxers represented Ireland at the 1924 Games. It was the nation's debut in the sport as well as the Olympics as an independent nation. Dwyer was the most successful Irish boxer, taking fourth place. His three bouts won were three times as many as the rest of the team combined, with Murphy getting the only other win.

Boxer Weight class Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / Bronze match
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Mossy Doyle Featherweight  Fields (USA)
L
Did not advance 17
Patrick Dwyer Welterweight  Basham (GBR)
W
 Cornelissen (NED)
W
 Stauffer (SUI)
W
 Méndez (ARG)
L
 Lewis (CAN)
L
4
Robert Hilliard Bantamweight Bye  Pertuzzo (ARG)
L
Did not advance 9
James Kelleher Lightweight  Rothwell (USA)
L
Did not advance 17
John Kidley Light heavyweight Bye  Sørsdal (NOR)
L
Did not advance 9
Myles McDonagh Flyweight Bye  Biete (ESP)
L
Did not advance 9
William Murphy Middleweight Bye  Nowak (POL)
W
 Black (CAN)
L
Did not advance 5

Football[edit]

Ireland competed in the Olympic football tournament for the first time in 1924.

Round 1
Bye
Round 2
May 28, 1924
Irish Free State  1–0  Bulgaria
Duncan Goal 75' Report
Stade Olympique, Colombes
Attendance: 1,500
Referee: A. Henriot (FRA)
Quarterfinals
June 2, 1924
Netherlands  2–1 (a.e.t.)  Irish Free State
Formenoy Goal 7' Goal 104' Report Ghent Goal 33'
Stade de Paris
Attendance: 2,000
Referee: Heinrich Retschury (AUT)
Final rank
5th place

Goalkeeper

Defenders

Midfielders

Forwards

Players reserves:

*Note: Murphy, Thomas, Robinson and Dowdall only played in friendly against Estonia.

Tennis[edit]

Men
Athlete Event Round of 128 Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Rank
William Ireland Singles  Halot (BEL)
L 1–6, 4–6, 4–6
Did not advance
Edwin McCrea Singles  Debran (SUI)
L 4–6, 4–6, 0–6
Did not advance
William Ireland
Edwin McCrea
Doubles N/A  Debran /
Syz (SUI)
L 6–4, 2–6, 2–6, 6–1, 4–6
Did not advance
Women
Athlete Event Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Rank
Rebecca Blair-White Singles Bye  Gagliardi (ITA)
L 6–4, 5–7, 2–6
Did not advance
Mary Wallis Singles  Covell (GBR)
L 6–3, 0–6, 2–6
Did not advance
Rebecca Blair-White
Mary Wallis
Doubles N/A Bye  Fick /
von Essen (SWE)
L 2–6, 7–5, 2–6
Did not advance
Mixed
Athlete Event Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Opposition
score
Rank
Rebecca Blair-White
William Ireland
Doubles  Covell /
Godfree (GBR)
L 2–6, 4–6
Did not advance
Edwin McCrea
Mary Wallis
Doubles Bye  Polley /
Jacob (IND)
W 9–7, 4–6, 9–7
 McKane /
Gilbert (IRL)
L 1–6, 5–7
Did not advance

Sources[edit]

  • The Boys In Green - The FAI International Story (1997): Sean Ryan [1]

External links[edit]