Irene Roberts

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Irene Roberts
Irene Roberts.jpg
Lynne McGranger as Irene Roberts (2011)
Home and Away character
Portrayed by Jacqui Phillips (1991-1992)
Lynne McGranger (1993–)
Duration 1991–
First appearance 29 October 1991
Introduced by Des Monaghan
Book appearances Home and Away: A Place in the Bay
Classification Present; regular
Profile
Occupation Business owner
Foster parent
School secretary

Irene Roberts is a fictional character from the Australian Channel Seven soap opera Home and Away, played by Lynne McGranger. She was previously played by actress Jacqui Phillips from 1991 until 1992 when McGranger took over the role on 12 January 1993. Irene was originally a recurring character, but in 7 October 1993 McGranger was promoted to the regular cast. McGranger is the longest-serving female character in the show and character has appear in every season of show for except first three seasons.

Casting[edit]

Actress Jacqui Phillips was cast the role in 1991, Irene was later recast with Lynne McGranger taking over the role.[1][2] McGranger was part of the guest cast when she joined because Irene was a recurring character, in 7 October 1993 she was promoted to the regular cast.[3] McGranger is now one of the longest serving cast members in the serial.[4] Speaking of her duration whilst interview by TV Tonight, McGranger stated: "Being very pragmatic, I love my job. You couldn’t be doing this for 18 years if you didn’t love it. You would go stark raving nuts, because it is intense."[5]

Character development[edit]

The serial's official website describe Irene stating: "Irene is your classic Aussie battler. Down to earth and with a wry sense of humour, she's always good for a yarn and a laugh. It doesn't matter who you are, young or old, Irene's door is always open to you."[6] Irene is seen as a caring woman who constantly takes in children to foster, of this they say: "Helping kids in need has given her a second chance at being a mum, and the opportunity to make up for all the mistakes she made with her own kids."[6]

Lynne McGranger, who portrays Roberts, said of her role, "Having to play that 'losing your mind' stuff was really a stretch for something like Home And Away, and for someone like Irene, who's very comfortably swanning around Summer Bay for 13 or 14 years, making people cups of tea and solving their problems...Sometimes you get a little too comfortable and that really jolted me out of my comfort zone. It was exhausting but exhilarating."[7]

Storylines[edit]

Irene arrived in Summer Bay in October 1991 as the alcoholic mother of two children, Damian and Fin,[1] being fostered by Pippa Ross. Having hit rock bottom after an unhappy marriage, she had started drinking heavily as a coping mechanism, and it was soon revealed that she had used violence towards Damian (and also her other son Nathan) on occasions while under the influence. Although Damian and Fin tried to maintain a relationship with her following her arrival, her drunken antics proved too much, and in January 1992, after falling down the stairs after a binge, she falsely accusing Damian and Fin of pushing her and then threatened to harm Pippa if she did not release Damian from her care. This proved to be the final straw for Damian and Fin; unable to cope with her behaviour any longer, the two, backed by Pippa and her husband Michael, told Irene to leave the Bay and go home and get her life back together. Irene left shortly afterwards.

After an 18 month absence, Irene returned to the bay in July 1993 after hearing in the news that Fin had nearly drowned during a deep sea dive. By this time, Irene had turned her life around and had not touched alcohol in over a year. Although initially sceptical, her children soon warmed to her when they realised that she really had changed for the better, and, following the arrival of Damian and Fin's brother Nathan in the Bay in August 1993 when Irene was considering leaving, Nathan explained that their mother was now recovered from alcoholism and had left their father; as a result Damian and Fin decided that they wanted her to stay at Summer Bay permananently. Despite the previous animosity between the two, Irene also soon became firm friends with Pippa, displaying a kinder side to her personality when she helped Pippa come to terms with the loss of her baby son Dale who died of SIDS in late 1993, and the death of her husband Michael, who drowned in a flash flood in 1996.

Before long Irene would become one of the key characters in the series, taking over the Beach House. Her three biological children moved back in with her, and she also fostered a number of other young people over time.

In 2003, Irene and Angie Russell (Laurie Foell) took an instant dislike to each other. Angie tried getting Irene in trouble with the law by framing her for sexually interfering with Nick, but Irene threatened Angie and did some detective work before eventually learning that Angie and Nick had been having an affair themselves. Horrified, Irene assaulted Angie and did her best from then on to destroy her. After Angie's dodgy past was exposed, Irene attended Angie's walk of shame at the school. Irene, amongst several others, was a top suspect when Angie was found dead. But it eventually turned out that Dylan, Angie's son, had accidentally killed her during an argument. Not disappointed by Angie's death, Irene was later shocked when Angie's past came back to haunt her instead in the form of Tasha Andrews (Isabel Lucas). In 2004, Irene adopted homeless Tasha but Angie's cousin, Josie Russell (Laurie Foell), turned up in town demanding legal custody of Tasha. Fortunately, Morag Bellingham (Cornelia Frances) assisted Irene in fighting Josie, who then backed off. Irene was later shocked when Josie revealed that Tasha's father had planted surveillance cameras in her house to spy over her and Irene. Morag managed to convince Irene to meet with Tasha's father, who then agreed to take the cameras away. In the end, Tasha stayed with Irene and Josie backed off once and for all.

In 2005, Irene and several others feared for Tasha's safety when she joined a religious group called the Believers. They seemed dodgy and Irene, not wanting to get involved, let Tasha make her own decisions. But the leader, Mumma Rose (Linden Wilkinson), proved to be dangerous and Irene watched from afar as Tasha's life spiraled out of control. Irene and Summer Bay later reunited after Josh West (Daniel Collopy) turned up in town and became mayor with the intention of starting developments and constructions in Summer Bay. In 2006, Irene was shocked when Josh was found dead and Tasha became a top suspect. Through a series of unfortunate events, Tasha was proven innocent. Irene tried starting a relationship with Barry Hyde (Ivar Kants), but Morag later exposed him as Josh's killer and the killer of his own wife, Kerry. Irene couldn't believe Barry had murdered two people and broke up with him. Irene was pleased, however, when Tasha saw sense and left the Believers after they tried to kill her.

In 2011, Irene insisted to everyone that Will was innocent, but Morag made sure Irene knew she was going to do everything she could to destroy Will. Irene was later devastated when Will managed to escape town and she decided to track him down. Will eventually contacted Irene, who found him at an old barn miles away from town. Will then forced Irene to promise to let him go and told her to look after Lily. But realizing that Alf hadn't killed Penn, Irene contacted the police and Irene watched on as Will was arrested and charged for murdering Penn instead. Irene was then devastated when Lily blamed her for everything.

In the 2013 season final of Home and Away, Irene is involved in the bomb explosion that occurs at the hospital. Irene is delivering food for Bianca Scott and Heath Braxton before the explosion. The bomb explodes and Irene is slammed into one of the walls she was standing by. Irene survives the bombing.

Reception[edit]

For her portrayal of Irene, McGranger was nominated for "Best Supporting Actress" and Irene for "Biggest Laugh in Soap" at the 1997 Inside Soap Awards.[8] At the 2007 Inside Soap Awards she was nominated in the category of "Funniest Performance" for her portrayal.[9] The Sydney Morning Herald have referred to Irene as one of the serial's three "legacy characters", along with Alf and Colleen.[10] Holy Soap recall Irene's most memorable moment as being: "Being attacked by the mad ex-wife of her former lover Ken."[11] In Catherine Deveny's book "It's not my fault they print them" described Irene as "the rough diamond with a heart of gold that speaks fluent Aussie cliché."[12] She added that there was no need for her to speak so Australian with the use of dialogue such as: "Fair dinkum" and "What the flipping 'eck is goin' on?"[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mercado, Andrew (2004). Super Aussie soaps: behind the scenes of Australia's best loved TV shows. Pluto Press Australia. p. 258. ISBN 1-86403-191-3. Retrieved 2010-09-30. 
  2. ^ "Coronation Street to defend crown". BBC News (BBC). 15 July 2008. Retrieved 2011-01-11. 
  3. ^ "Lynne McGranger". RTÉ Television. (Raidió Teilifís Éireann). Retrieved 2011-01-10. 
  4. ^ "Ada: 'Why I'm staying in Summer Bay!'". What's on TV. (IPC Media). 17 June 2009. Retrieved 2011-01-11. 
  5. ^ Knox, David (13 October 2010). "Summer Bay’s matriarch". TV Tonight. Retrieved 2011-01-11. 
  6. ^ a b "Irene Roberts - Yahoo!7 TV". Yahoo!7. Seven Network and Yahoo!. Retrieved 2011-01-10. 
  7. ^ "Lynne loves tough roles". Metro. Associated Newspapers Ltd. 16 January 2007. Retrieved 2011-01-11. 
  8. ^ "The 1997 Inside Soap Awards". Inside Soap (Attic Futura (UK) Ltd) (76): 48, 49. 31 May – 13 June 1997. 
  9. ^ Green, Kris (3 July 2007). "Inside Soap Awards 2007: The Nominations". Digital Spy. (Hachette Filipacchi UK). Retrieved 2011-01-10. 
  10. ^ "Marilyn's next move". The Sydney Morning Herald. (Fairfax Media). 18 March 2010. Retrieved 2011-01-10. 
  11. ^ "Holy Soap > Home and Away > Cast > Irene Roberts". Holy Soap. (Channel 5). Archived from the original on 11 January 2011. Retrieved 2011-01-10. 
  12. ^ a b Deveny, Catherine (2007). It's not my fault they print them (1st ed.). Schwartz Publishing. ISBN 1-86395-119-9. 

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