Iris Krasnow

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Iris Krasnow (born 1954) is an American author, journalism professor, and keynote speaker who specializes in relationships and personal growth. She is the author of Surrendering to Motherhood (1998), the New York Times bestseller Surrendering to Marriage (2002),[1] Surrendering to Yourself (2003), I Am My Mother's Daughter (2007), and The Secret Lives of Wives (2011).[2] Krasnow's sixth book, Sex After...Women Share How Intimacy Changes As Life Changes, was published in February 2014.[3]

Education and Early Career[edit]

Krasnow was born and raised in Oak Park, Illinois. After graduating from Stanford University, where she majored in photo-journalism, she became a fashion writer for the Dallas Times Herald. She then moved to United Press International in Washington, D.C., to become the national feature writer. In her several years at UPI, Krasnow specialized in celebrity profiles, including Yoko Ono, Elie Wiesel, Ted Kennedy, Barbara Bush, Norman Mailer, and Queen Noor of Jordan. Krasnow also has an M.A. in Liberal Studies from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. She is a professor in the American University School of Communication.

Books[edit]

Krasnow left her job in daily journalism when she gave birth to twins in 1993, making her the mother of four sons under the age of three. Using this experience, she wrote her first book, Surrendering to Motherhood: Losing Your Mind, Finding Your Soul, which examines the work-family balance for women and takes the stand that motherhood should be viewed as a substantial source of fulfillment and grounding happiness.

Her subsequent books focus on marriage, personal actualization, and mother-daughter relationships: her fifth, The Secret Lives of Wives: Women Share What It Really Takes to Stay Married, presents strategies for successful long-lasting marriages; and her most recent, Sex After... Women Share How Intimacy Changes as Life Changes, takes readers from the college hook-up culture to dating after eighty. Krasnow's books have been translated into eight languages.

Journalism, Teaching, and Public Speaking[edit]

Krasnow has written for many national publications, including Parade, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post,[4] AARP The Magazine, and The Huffington Post.[5] She has been a guest on numerous national television and radio programs including Oprah,[6] Good Morning America, AARP,[7] The Today Show, and All Things Considered, and she has been featured on CNN[8] several times. For several years she was the Relationship Correspondent for the Fox Morning News in Baltimore. Interviews with Krasnow, and reviews of her work, have appeared in Time,[9] O: The Oprah Magazine, Glamour, The New Yorker, New York Times,[10] U.S. News & World Report, and Redbook. Since 1994, Krasnow has been a journalism professor in the School of Communications at American University in Washington, D.C., serving as Academic Director of AU's Washington Journalism Semester.[11][12] She frequently speaks[13] on marriage, childrearing, and "female generational angst" to groups across the United States.[14]

Personal life[edit]

Krasnow lives in Annapolis, Maryland,[15] with her husband, Charles E. Anthony, an architect, whom she married in 1988,[16] and their four sons; Theodore (Proxy Dreams), Isaac, Zane and Jackson.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Best Sellers" New York Times, June 10, 2001
  2. ^ "The Secret Lives of Wives: Women Share What it Really Takes to Stay Married", 29 Sept. 2001, Gotham Books
  3. ^ "Iris Krasnow's Sex After..." New York Times, February 7, 2014
  4. ^ Online Discussion, "Making Marriage Work", Washingtonpost.com, June 21, 2002
  5. ^ "These 8 Books Could Save Your Marriage", HuffingtonPost.com, August 20, 2011
  6. ^ Radio Interview, The Lisa Oz Show, Oprah Radio
  7. ^ Radio Interview, Prime Time Radio, with Mike Cuthbert, AARP Radio, May 6, 2009
  8. ^ Radio Interview,CNN Saturday Morning News, with Judy Kuriansky, July 27, 2002
  9. ^ "I Dos and Don'ts", by Amy Dickinson, Time, April 23, 2001
  10. ^ "Love in the 21st Century: A Brief History of Bad Advice", by Judith Shulevitz, New York Times, Oct. 14, 2001
  11. ^ "Faculty Profile", American University, Washington, D.C
  12. ^ "Professor's Passions Drive Her Writing", by Michael Wargo, SOC News, April 12, 2010
  13. ^ Iris Krasnow Speech Topics, The Harry Walker Agency
  14. ^ "2008 Women's Event", Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, TX, Jan. 22, 2008
  15. ^ "Iris Krasnow's book, 'The Secret Lives of Wives,' looks at how long-lasting marriages survive," by Ellen McCarthy, The Washington Post, October 21, 2011
  16. ^ "Weddings", New York Times, March 13, 1988

External links[edit]