Irminenschaft

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Irminenschaft (or, Irminism, Irminenreligion) is a current of Ariosophy based on a Germanic deity Irmin which is supposedly reconstructed from literaric, linguistic and onomastic sources. Among other sources the Prefix "Irmin" is well documented in the from Irminsul "great pillar that supports all"/"Columna Universalis Sustenans Omni", as described in Einhards 'Vita Karoli Magni', and informed by Tacitus (~1st century) via a mentioned Germanic tribe name of Hermiones; The Old Saxon adjective irmin being synonymous to "great, strong". As such it may also have been an epithet of later deities like Ziu (Týr) or Wodan (Odin)). Purported evidence also stems from the occurrence of the word "Irmingot", found in the Old High German "Hildebrandslied". Notably the Nazi occultist Karl Maria Wiligut claimed a historical Irminism, established in 12,500 BC, later ousted by Wotanism.


References[edit]

  • Wiligut, Karl Maria (2001). The Secret King: Karl Maria Wiligut, Himmler's Lord of the Runes. Dominion. ISBN 1-885972-21-0. 
  • Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas (2003). The Occult Roots of Nazism: Secret Aryan Cults and Their Influence on Nazi Ideology. Gardners Books. ISBN 1-86064-973-4. ; originally published as Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas (1992). The Occult Roots of Nazism: Secret Aryan Cults and Their Influence on Nazi Ideology; The Ariosophists of Austria and Germany, 1890-1935. New York University Press. ISBN 0-8147-3060-4. 
  • Mund, Rudolf. 1982. Der Rasputin Himmlers: Die Wiligut Saga.
  • Lange, Hans-Jürgen. 1998. Karl Maria Wiligut - Himmlers Rasputin und seine Erben.