Irvine Glennie

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Sir Irvine Glennie
The Royal Navy during the Second World War A14294.jpg
Rear Admiral Glennie on board HMS Tyne when Rear Admiral (Destroyers), Home Fleet
Born (1892-07-22)22 July 1892
Died 8 September 1980(1980-09-08) (aged 88)
Lymington, Hampshire
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
Years of service 1905 – 1947
Rank Admiral
Commands held HMNZS Achilles
New Zealand Division
HMS Hood
Senior British Naval Officer, Western Atlantic
Battles/wars First World War
Second World War
Awards Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath

Admiral Sir Irvine Gordon Glennie KCB (22 July 1892 – 8 September 1980) was a Royal Navy officer who went on to be Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station.

Naval career[edit]

Educated at the Royal Naval College, Osborne and the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, Glennie joined the Royal Navy in 1905 and served in the Second World War in the Home Fleet and in the Grand Fleet.[1] He joined the Staff at the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth in 1922 and then commanded Destroyers from 1925.[1] He was appointed Flag Captain commanding HMNZS Achilles and Chief of Staff to the Commander-in-Chief of the New Zealand Division in 1936[1] before becoming Commander-in-Chief of the New Zealand Division in 1938.[2]

Rear Admiral Glennie, far left, meets King George VI aboard HMS Duke of York at Scapa Flow, August 1943

He also served in the Second World War as Flag Captain commanding HMS Hood and Chief of Staff of the Battle Cruiser Squadron from 1939; it was in this capacity that he took part in the Attack on Mers-el-Kébir in July 1940.[3] He then served as Commander of Destroyers in the Mediterranean Fleet from 1941, taking part in the Battle of Crete and preventing Axis troops from landing on that island in May 1941, before becoming Commander of Destroyers in the Home Fleet from 1943.[1] He was made Senior Naval Officer, Western Atlantic from 1944; this role evolved into Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station in 1945.[1] He welcomed President Harry S. Truman to Bermuda after the War[4] and retired in 1947.[1]

He died in 1980 at Lymington in Hampshire.[3]

References[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
Edmund Drummond
Commander-in-Chief, New Zealand Division
June 1938–December 1938
Succeeded by
James Rivett-Carnac
Preceded by
Sir Alban Curteis
Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station
1944–1945
Succeeded by
Sir William Tennant