Isaach de Bankolé

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Isaach de Bankolé
Isaach De Bankole.jpg
Isaach de Bankolé in Karlovy Vary (2009)
Born (1957-08-12) 12 August 1957 (age 57)
Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
Occupation Actor
Years active 1984–present

Isaach or Isaac de Bankolé (born 12 August 1957) is an Ivorian actor.[1][2]

Early life and Education[edit]

He was born in Abidjan to Yoruba parents from Benin.[3] His grandparents are from Nigeria.[4] He studied Acting at Cours Simon and earned an M.A. from the University of Paris.

Career[edit]

He has appeared in over fifty films, including Jim Jarmusch's Night on Earth, Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai, Coffee and Cigarettes and The Limits of Control.[5] He appeared in the movie Machetero, in the role of journalist interviewing an imprisoned Puerto Rican revolutionary, along with the members of the New York City-based punk band Ricanstruction.

He has also appeared in Lars von Trier's Manderlay. He recently portrayed Steven Obanno, a terrorist, in the 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale and also "The Lone Man", an assassin in Jim Jarmusch's film, The Limits of Control (2009).[6] In 2013, he starred as Ayodele Balogun in Andrew Dosunmu's Mother of George, which premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and was the closing night selection for Maryland Film Festival 2013.

Filmography[edit]

Director Jim Jarmusch (left) and de Bankolé (right) promoting The Limits of Control at the San Sebastian International Film Festival in September 2009.

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New York Times". Movies.nytimes.com. Retrieved 2 April 2012. 
  2. ^ "Isaach De Bankolé An Unexpected Gentleman". MADMUSEUM. Retrieved October 21, 2014. 
  3. ^ Segun Oguntola (June 6, 2011). "Isaach De Bankolé: A Flower of the Tribe". Nigerians in America. Retrieved May 20, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Jim Jarmusch interviews Isaach De Bankole" (in German). Filmgalerie451.de. Retrieved 2 April 2012. 
  5. ^ "The Limits of Control". The Guardian. United Kingdom. Retrieved October 21, 2014. 
  6. ^ Dargis, Manohla (30 April 2009). "New York Times". Movies.nytimes.com. Retrieved 2 April 2012. 

External links[edit]