Isaacs Fury

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Fury
Isaacs Fury II AN2081059.jpg
Isaacs Fury II
Role Sports biplane
Manufacturer Homebuilt
Designer John Isaacs
First flight 1963
Number built 18
Isaacs Fury II

The Isaacs Fury is a British homebuilt sporting biplane designed by John Isaacs as a seven-tenths scale replica of the Hawker Fury fighter.[1]

Development[edit]

Using the Currie Wot construction methods as a basis, John Isaacs designed a single-seat wood and fabric sporting biplane for homebuilders.[2] It was a seven-tenths replica of the 1935 Hawker Fury biplane fighter.[2] It was a single-bay biplane with a fixed tailskid landing gear and powered by a 65 hp (48 kW) Walter Mikron III piston engine in the nose with a two-bladed propeller.[2] It has a single-seat open cockpit just aft of the wing.[2] The prototype (G-ASCM) built by the designer between 1961 and 1963 at Southampton, England, first flew from Thruxton Aerodrome on the 30 August 1963.[2]

Between 1966 and 1967 the aircraft was re-engined with a 125 hp (93 kW) Lycoming O-290-D engine and first flown as the Fury Mk 2 in May 1967.[2] The design was made available to amateur constructors.[2]

The rights to plans for the design are held by the UK Light Aircraft Association.[3]

Variants[edit]

Fury Mk 1
Prototype with a 65 hp (48 kW) Walter Mikron III piston engine.[2]
Fury Mk 2
Prototype re-engined with a 125 hp (93 kW) Lycoming O-290-D piston engine for amateur construction.[2]

Specifications (Fury Mk 2)[edit]

Fury II

Data from Taylor[4]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 19 ft 3 in (5.87 m)
  • Wingspan: 21 ft 0 in (6.4 m)
  • Empty weight: 710 lb (322 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1000 lb (454 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-290-D piston engine, 125 hp (94 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 115 mph (185 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 100 mph (161 km/h)
  • Range: 200 miles (321 km)
  • Rate of climb: 1600 ft/min (488 m/s)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Air Trails: 79. Winter 1971. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Jackson 1974, pp. 256–257
  3. ^ Bayerl, Robby; Martin Berkemeier; et al: World Directory of Leisure Aviation 2011-12, page 107. WDLA UK, Lancaster UK, 2011. ISSN 1368-485X
  4. ^ Taylor 1996, p. 476

Bibliography[edit]

  • Jackson, A.J. (1974). British Civil Aircraft since 1919 Volume 3. London: Putnam. ISBN 0-370-10014-X. 
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1996). Brassey's World Aircraft & Systems Directory. London, England: Brassey's. ISBN 1-85753-198-1. 

External links[edit]