Ishite-ji

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Ishite-ji Niōmon (1318); a National Treasure
Ishite-ji three-storey pagoda and gorintō, both from the end of the Kamakura Period and Important Cultural Properties

Ishite-ji (石手寺?) is a Shingon temple in Matsuyama, Ehime Prefecture, Japan. It is Temple 51 on the Shikoku 88 temple pilgrimage. Seven of its structures have been designated National Treasures or Important Cultural Properties.

History[edit]

The temple of Annoyō-ji was originally founded by Gyōki, and converted from a Hossō to a Shingon temple by Kūkai. Rebuilt by the ruler of Iyo Province in the eighth century, many of the temple buildings were destroyed by the Chōsokabe in the sixteenth century. The aetiology sees the temple's name changed to Ishite-ji or 'stone-hand temple' after the tightly-clenched hand of the newborn son of the lord of Iyo Province was opened by a priest from the Annoyō-ji to reveal a stone inscribed 'Emon Saburō is reborn'.[1]

Buildings[edit]

Treasures[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Miyata, Taisen (2006). The 88 Temples of Shikoku Island, Japan (vid. pp. 102f.). Koyasan Buddhist Temple, Los Angeles. 
  2. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  3. ^ "Ishiteji Niōmon". Matsuyama City. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 
  4. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  5. ^ "Ishiteji Sanjūnotō". Matsuyama City. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 
  6. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  7. ^ "Ishiteji Hondō". Matsuyama City. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 
  8. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  9. ^ "Ishiteji Kariteimotendō". Matsuyama City. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 
  10. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  11. ^ "Ishiteji Shōrō". Matsuyama City. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 
  12. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  13. ^ "Ishiteji Gomadō". Matsuyama City. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 
  14. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  15. ^ "Ishiteji Gorintō". Matsuyama City. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 
  16. ^ "Ishiteji bell". Matsuyama City. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 
  17. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 
  18. ^ a b Reader, Ian (2005). Making Pilgrimages: Meaning and Practice in Shikoku. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 60f. ISBN 978-0-8248-2907-0. 

References[edit]

  • Banzai, Mayumi. (1973). A Pilgrimage to the 88 Temples in Shikoku Island. Tokyo: Kodansha. OCLC 969829
  • Miyata, Taisen. (2006). The 88 Temples of Shikoku Island, Japan. Los Angeles: Koyasan Buddhist Temple. OCLC 740530179
  • Reader, Ian. (2005). Making Pilgrimages: Meaning and Practice in Shikoku. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. 10-ISBN 0824828763/13-ISBN 9780824828769; OCLC 56050925

Coordinates: 33°50′52.3″N 132°47′47.3″E / 33.847861°N 132.796472°E / 33.847861; 132.796472