Islamic Free Market Institute

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Islamic Free Market Institute (also known simply as the Islamic Institute) is a Muslim outreach group founded by Khaled Saffuri and Grover Norquist in 1998,[1] where they served as executive director and chairman, respectively.[2]

Synopsis[edit]

The Safa Trust donated at least $35,000, and the International Institute of Islamic Thought contributed $11,000. Both organizations were alleged to be part of the so-called SAAR Network of interrelated business and non-profit entities with ties to sources of terrorism financing, and were among the subjects of a March 20, 2002 raid conducted by the U.S. Customs Service under the auspices of Operation Green Quest.

The Operation Green Quest raids led to the convictions of two people, including Abdurahman Alamoudi, who worked for the SAAR Foundation. Alamoudi admitted that he plotted with Libya to assassinate the Saudi ruler and was sentenced to 23 years in jail.[3][4][5]

Notable personnel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1] Saffuri's Ties to Terror Suspects; Is Khaled Saffuri, a prominent Palestinian activist with connections to terror suspects, exerting undue influence on the Bush administration, or is he getting a bad rap?, Kenneth R. Timmerman, Insight on the News, March 1, 2004
  2. ^ , Khaled Saffuri: Where is He Now?, Gary H. Johnson, September 30, 2010
  3. ^ Markon, Jerry, "Witness Is Silent in Terror Probe; Ex-Professor Says Grand Jury Testimony Would Endanger Him," The Washington Post, November 14, 2006, accessed January 27, 2010
  4. ^ Gerstein, Josh, "Judge Dismisses Suit Questioning Federal Tactics," New York Sun, November 8, 2007, accessed January 27, 2010
  5. ^ Gerstein, Josh, "A Prosecutor Is Called 'Relentless'," New York Sun, July 28, 2008, accessed January 27, 2010

External links[edit]