Island Heights, New Jersey

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Island Heights, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Island Heights
Map of Island Heights in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Island Heights in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Island Heights, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Island Heights, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°56′30″N 74°08′38″W / 39.941792°N 74.143814°W / 39.941792; -74.143814Coordinates: 39°56′30″N 74°08′38″W / 39.941792°N 74.143814°W / 39.941792; -74.143814[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Ocean
Incorporated May 6, 1887
Government[5]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Small Municipality)
 • Mayor James Biggs (term ends June 30, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Ellie Rogalski[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 0.907 sq mi (2.350 km2)
 • Land 0.611 sq mi (1.582 km2)
 • Water 0.296 sq mi (0.767 km2)  32.65%
Area rank 514th of 566 in state
26th of 33 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 36 ft (11 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total 1,673
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 1,681
 • Rank 506th of 566 in state
24th of 33 in county[12]
 • Density 2,738.3/sq mi (1,057.3/km2)
 • Density rank 227th of 566 in state
11th of 33 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08732[13][14]
Area code(s) 732[15]
FIPS code 3402934530[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885262[1][18]
Website www.islandheightsborough.com

Island Heights is a borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,673,[7][8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 78 (-4.5%) from the 1,751 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 281 (+19.1%) from the 1,470 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Island Heights was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on May 6, 1887, from portions of Dover Township (now Toms River Township), based on the results of a referendum held on November 18, 1886.[20][21] The borough is a dry town where alcohol cannot be sold.[22][23]

Island Heights takes its name from two sources: it originally was an island. It is situated by a steep bluff rising 60 feet (18 m) above the Toms River. It was originally known as Doctor Johnson's island, being included in the patent granted to him in 1680. In the century before the American Revolutionary War, it was known as Dillon's Island, probably for James Dillon, a prominent man in Toms River. The land was purchased by John Imlay of Allentown, who sold it in 1794 to Issac Gulick. In 1797, Gulick and his wife Abagail sold it to Abraham and George Parker. In 1799, the Parker brothers sold it to Abel Middleton of Upper Freehold Township.[24]

Geography[edit]

Island Heights is located at 39°56′30″N 74°08′38″W / 39.941792°N 74.143814°W / 39.941792; -74.143814 (39.941792,-74.143814). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.907 square miles (2.350 km2), of which, 0.611 square miles (1.582 km2) of it was land and 0.296 square miles (0.767 km2) of it (32.65%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 271
1900 316 16.6%
1910 313 −0.9%
1920 194 −38.0%
1930 453 133.5%
1940 392 −13.5%
1950 795 102.8%
1960 1,150 44.7%
1970 1,397 21.5%
1980 1,575 12.7%
1990 1,470 −6.7%
2000 1,751 19.1%
2010 1,673 −4.5%
Est. 2013 1,681 [11] 0.5%
Population sources:
1890-2000[25] 1890-1920[26] 1890[27]
1890-1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[7][8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,673 people, 683 households, and 487 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,738.3 per square mile (1,057.3/km2). There were 831 housing units at an average density of 1,360.2 per square mile (525.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.82% (1,603) White, 0.24% (4) Black or African American, 0.12% (2) Native American, 1.37% (23) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.36% (6) from other races, and 2.09% (35) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.39% (40) of the population.[7]

There were 683 households, of which 25.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.0% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.7% were non-families. 22.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.88.[7]

In the borough, 18.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 21.0% from 25 to 44, 35.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.0 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $77,269 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,616) and the median family income was $96,458 (+/- $21,090). Males had a median income of $75,234 (+/- $7,830) versus $47,045 (+/- $11,606) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $39,493 (+/- $4,086). About 5.6% of families and 5.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.8% of those under age 18 and 1.2% of those age 65 or over.[33]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 1,751 people, 705 households, and 497 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,909.2 people per square mile (1,126.8/km2). There were 807 housing units at an average density of 1,340.8 per square mile (519.3/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.77% White, 0.11% African American, 0.46% Native American, 0.63% Asian, 0.06% from other races, and 0.97% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.37% of the population.[31][32]

There were 705 households out of which 28.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.0% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.4% were non-families. 24.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.97.[31][32]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.4% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 24.5% from 25 to 44, 29.2% from 45 to 64, and 17.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 92.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.4 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the borough was $61,125, and the median income for a family was $72,596. Males had a median income of $47,500 versus $38,375 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,975. About 2.6% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.5% of those under age 18 and 9.1% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Island Heights is governed under the Faulkner Act form of municipal government, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law, within the Small Municipality (Plan A), enacted by direct petition as of July 1, 1974.[34] The government consists of a mayor and a six-member council, elected in non-partisan elections. The mayor is directly elected to a four-year term of office. Councilmembers served three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Island Heights Borough is Jim Biggs, whose term of office ends on June 30, 2014. Borough Council members are Council President Jeffrey B. Silver (2015), John Bendel (2014), Greg Heizler (2015), Peter Keir (2013) and Joe Rogalski, with one seat vacant.[35][36][37] Brian Taboada, who had been serving a term ending in 2014, announced at an August 2013 council meeting that he would be stepping down from office to focus on school obligations.[38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Island Heights is located in the 3rd Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 10th state legislative district.[8][40][41]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[43][44] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[45][46]

For the 2014-15 Session, the 10th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James W. Holzapfel (R, Toms River Township) and in the General Assembly by Gregory P. McGuckin (R, Toms River Township) and David W. Wolfe (R, Brick Township).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[50] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a deputy Director from among its members. As of 2014, Ocean County's Freeholders (with department directorship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari (Public Works, Senior Services; R, Toms River, term ends December 31, 2014),[51] Freeholder Deputy Director John C. Bartlett, Jr. (Finance, Parks and Recreation; Pine Beach, 2015),[52] John P. Kelly (Law and Public Safety; Eagleswood Township, 2016),[53] James F. Lacey (Transportation; Brick Township, 2016)[54] and Gerry P. Little (Human Services; Surf City, 2015)[55][56][57] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2015, Barnegat Light),[58][59] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2016; Toms River) and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2018, Beachwood).[60][61][62]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,329 registered voters in Island Heights, of which 285 (21.4%) were registered as Democrats, 415 (31.2%) were registered as Republicans and 629 (47.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[63] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 79.4% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 97.4% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[63][64]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 52.9% of the vote here (558 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 44.5% (469 votes) and other candidates with 2.1% (22 votes), among the 1,054 ballots cast by the borough's 1,371 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.9%.[65] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 53.9% of the vote here (568 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 44.5% (469 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (14 votes), among the 1,054 ballots cast by the borough's 1,380 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.4.[66]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 59.8% of the vote here (453 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 32.6% (247 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.5% (49 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (7 votes), among the 757 ballots cast by the borough's 1,346 registered voters, yielding a 56.2% turnout.[67]

Education[edit]

The Island Heights School District serves public school students in Kindergarten through sixth grade. Island Heights Elementary School had an enrollment of 112 students as of the 2010-11 school year.[68]

Public school students in seventh through twelfth grades attend the schools of the Central Regional School District, which also serves students from the municipalities of Berkeley Township, Ocean Gate, Seaside Heights and Seaside Park.[69] The schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[70]) are Central Regional Middle School[71] for grades 7 and 8 (660 students) and Central Regional High School[72] for grades 9 - 12 (1,306 students).[73][74]

Transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit offers seasonal bus service between the borough and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 137 route and to Newark on the 67 route.[75]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Island Heights include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Hall, Borough of Island Heights. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. p. 53.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Island Heights, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 6, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Island Heights borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 9, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 6. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Island Heights borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 9, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c 2010 Census Populations: Ocean County, Asbury Park Press. Accessed July 18, 2011.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Island Heights, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 9, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Island Heights, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 9, 2012.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 203. Accessed June 9, 2012.
  21. ^ Island Heights Borough, Ocean County Historical Society. Accessed August 3, 2006.
  22. ^ New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control. New Jersey ABC list of dry towns (May 1, 2013)
  23. ^ Giordano, Rita. "More towns catching liquor-license buzz; Moorestown considers ending its dry spell", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 24, 2007. Accessed February 16, 2014.
  24. ^ Salter, Edwin. Salter’s History of Monmouth and Ocean Counties New Jersey, Embracing a Genealogical Record of Earliest Settlers in Monmouth and Ocean Counties and Their Descendants, p 406 ff. 1890
  25. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Ocean County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  26. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  27. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  28. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  30. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Island Heights borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Island Heights borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Island Heights borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 9, 2012.
  34. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  35. ^ Mayor and Council, Borough of Island Heights. Accessed October 16, 2013. As of the data accessed, term-end dates of 2011 are listed for John Bendel and Brian Taboada, and 2012 dates for Greg Heizler and Jeffrey B. Silver.
  36. ^ 2013 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. p. 4. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  37. ^ Borough of Island Heights, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  38. ^ Mayor and Council Newsletter - Council Meeting, Borough of Island Heights, August 20, 2013. Accessed October 16, 2013. "Council Member Brian Taboada stated it is with great regrets that he informs the borough of his resignation from the Island Heights borough council. Due to commitments from school, he will no longer be able to attend any future council meetings. In the interest of the borough, he feels that he should step aside for someone who has the will and desire to provide the borough the service it so richly deserves."
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  43. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 27, 2014.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ Freeholder History, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  51. ^ Freeholder Joseph H. Vicari, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  52. ^ Freeholder John C. Bartlett, Jr., Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder John P. Kelly, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder James F. Lacey, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder Gerry P. Little, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  56. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  57. ^ County Directory, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  58. ^ County Clerk, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  59. ^ Biography of Scott M. Colabella, Office of the County Clerk. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  60. ^ County Surrogate Jeffrey W. Moran, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  61. ^ 2013 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  62. ^ 2013 General Election Winner's List, Ocean County Clerk's Office, November 6, 2013. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  63. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Ocean, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  64. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  65. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  66. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  67. ^ 2009 Governor: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  68. ^ Data for the Island Heights School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  69. ^ Central Regional School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 16, 2013. "The Central Regional School District is located in the Bayville section of Berkeley Township and draws from the constituent districts of Berkeley Township, Island Heights, Ocean Gate, Seaside Heights, and Seaside Park."
  70. ^ School Data for the Central Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  71. ^ Central Regional Middle School, Central Regional School District. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  72. ^ Central Regional High School, Central Regional School District. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  73. ^ Schools, Central Regional School District. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  74. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Central Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  75. ^ Ocean County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  76. ^ Barron, James. "RESTORING AMERICA'S PAST: BED AND BREAKFAST INNS", The New York Times, May 14, 1987. Accessed June 9, 2012. "Joy Peto Smiley operates the Studio of John F. Peto, a B & B in the house in Island Heights, N.J., where her grandfather painted portraits and landscapes."
  77. ^ Sapia, Joseph. "Louis Prima's widow seeks royalties ISLAND HEIGHTS WOMAN WED BANDLEADER IN '63 Louis Prima's wife files suit over royalties", Asbury Park Press, December 24, 2002. Accessed July 18, 2011. "AN Island Heights woman - the last of musician Louis Prima's five wives - is suing a California recording company, seeking royalties for the showman's work."

External links[edit]