Isotopes of copper

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Copper (Cu) has two stable isotopes, 63Cu and 65Cu, along with 27 radioisotopes. The most stable of these is 67Cu with a half-life of 61.83 hours. The least stable is 54Cu with a half-life of approximately 75 ns. Most have half-lives under a minute. Unstable copper isotopes with atomic masses below 63 tend to undergo β+ decay, while isotopes with atomic masses above 65 tend to undergo β decay. 64Cu decays by both β+ and β.[1]

68Cu, 69Cu, 71Cu, 72Cu, and 76Cu each have one metastable isomer. 70Cu has two isomers, making a total of 7 distinct isomers. The most stable of these is 68mCu with a half-life of 3.75 minutes. The least stable is 69mCu with a half-life of 360 ns.[1]

Standard atomic mass: 63.546(3) u.

Table[edit]

nuclide
symbol
Z(p) N(n)  
isotopic mass (u)
 
half-life decay
mode(s)[2][n 1]
daughter
isotope(s)[n 2]
nuclear
spin
representative
isotopic
composition
(mole fraction)
range of natural
variation
(mole fraction)
excitation energy
52Cu 29 23 51.99718(28)# p 51Ni (3+)#
53Cu 29 24 52.98555(28)# <300 ns p 52Ni (3/2-)#
54Cu 29 25 53.97671(23)# <75 ns p 53Ni (3+)#
55Cu 29 26 54.96605(32)# 40# ms [>200 ns] β+ 55Ni 3/2-#
p 54Ni
56Cu 29 27 55.95856(15)# 93(3) ms β+ 56Ni (4+)
57Cu 29 28 56.949211(17) 196.3(7) ms β+ 57Ni 3/2-
58Cu 29 29 57.9445385(17) 3.204(7) s β+ 58Ni 1+
59Cu 29 30 58.9394980(8) 81.5(5) s β+ 59Ni 3/2-
60Cu 29 31 59.9373650(18) 23.7(4) min β+ 60Ni 2+
61Cu 29 32 60.9334578(11) 3.333(5) h β+ 61Ni 3/2-
62Cu 29 33 61.932584(4) 9.673(8) min β+ 62Ni 1+
63Cu 29 34 62.9295975(6) Stable 3/2- 0.6915(15) 0.68983-0.69338
64Cu 29 35 63.9297642(6) 12.700(2) h β+ (61%) 64Ni 1+
β- (39%) 64Zn
65Cu 29 36 64.9277895(7) Stable 3/2- 0.3085(15) 0.30662-0.31017
66Cu 29 37 65.9288688(7) 5.120(14) min β- 66Zn 1+
67Cu 29 38 66.9277303(13) 61.83(12) h β- 67Zn 3/2-
68Cu 29 39 67.9296109(17) 31.1(15) s β- 68Zn 1+
68mCu 721.6(7) keV 3.75(5) min IT (84%) 68Cu (6-)
β- (16%) 68Zn
69Cu 29 40 68.9294293(15) 2.85(15) min β- 69Zn 3/2-
69mCu 2741.8(10) keV 360(30) ns (13/2+)
70Cu 29 41 69.9323923(17) 44.5(2) s β- 70Zn (6-)
70m1Cu 101.1(3) keV 33(2) s β- 70Zn (3-)
70m2Cu 242.6(5) keV 6.6(2) s 1+
71Cu 29 42 70.9326768(16) 19.4(14) s β- 71Zn (3/2-)
71mCu 2756(10) keV 271(13) ns (19/2-)
72Cu 29 43 71.9358203(15) 6.6(1) s β- 72Zn (1+)
72mCu 270(3) keV 1.76(3) µs (4-)
73Cu 29 44 72.936675(4) 4.2(3) s β- (>99.9%) 73Zn (3/2-)
β-, n (<.1%) 72Zn
74Cu 29 45 73.939875(7) 1.594(10) s β- 74Zn (1+,3+)
75Cu 29 46 74.94190(105) 1.224(3) s β- (96.5%) 75Zn (3/2-)#
β-, n (3.5%) 74Zn
76Cu 29 47 75.945275(7) 641(6) ms β- (97%) 76Zn (3,5)
β-, n (3%) 75Zn
76mCu 0(200)# keV 1.27(30) s β- 76Zn (1,3)
77Cu 29 48 76.94785(43)# 469(8) ms β- 77Zn 3/2-#
78Cu 29 49 77.95196(43)# 342(11) ms β- 78Zn
79Cu 29 50 78.95456(54)# 188(25) ms β-, n (55%) 78Zn 3/2-#
β- (45%) 79Zn
80Cu 29 51 79.96087(64)# 100# ms [>300 ns] β- 80Zn
  1. ^ Abbreviations:
    IT: Isomeric transition
  2. ^ Bold for stable isotopes

Notes[edit]

  • The precision of the isotope abundances and atomic mass is limited through variations. The given ranges should be applicable to any normal terrestrial material.
  • Values marked # are not purely derived from experimental data, but at least partly from systematic trends. Spins with weak assignment arguments are enclosed in parentheses.
  • Uncertainties are given in concise form in parentheses after the corresponding last digits. Uncertainty values denote one standard deviation, except isotopic composition and standard atomic mass from IUPAC which use expanded uncertainties
  • Nuclide masses are given by IUPAP Commission on Symbols, Units, Nomenclature, Atomic Masses and Fundamental Constants (SUNAMCO)
  • Isotope abundances are given by IUPAC Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights

Medical Applications[edit]

Copper offers a relatively large number of radioisotopes that are potentially suitable for use in nuclear medicine.

There is a growing interest in the use of 64Cu, 62Cu, 61Cu, and 60Cu for diagnostic purposes and 67Cu and 64Cu for targeted radiotherapy. For example, 64Cu has a longer half-life and is thus ideal for diagnostic PET imaging of biological molecules.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b G. Audi, A. H. Wapstra, C. Thibault, J. Blachot and O. Bersillon (2003). "The NUBASE evaluation of nuclear and decay properties". Nuclear Physics A 729: 3–128. Bibcode:2003NuPhA.729....3A. doi:10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2003.11.001. 
  2. ^ Nucleonica: Universal Nuclide Chart
  3. ^ Harris, M. "Clarity uses a cutting-edge imaging technique to guide drug development." Nature Biotechnology Sep 2014: 34


Isotopes of nickel Isotopes of copper Isotopes of zinc
Table of nuclides