István Bittó

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
István Bittó
Bitto Istvan.jpg
Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Hungary
In office
March 21, 1874 – March 2, 1875
Monarch Francis Joseph I
Preceded by József Szlávy
Succeeded by Béla Wenckheim
Personal details
Born (1822-05-03)May 3, 1822
Sárosfa, Kingdom of Hungary (today Blatná na Ostrove, Slovakia)
Died March 7, 1903(1903-03-07) (aged 80)
Budapest, Hungary
Nationality Hungarian

Count István Bittó de Sárosfa et Nádasd (Sárosfa, Kingdom of Hungary (today Blatná na Ostrove, Slovakia), May 3, 1822 – Budapest, March 7, 1903) was a Hungarian politician who served as Speaker of the House of Representatives of Hungary from September 10, 1872 to March 23, 1874 and as Prime Minister of Hungary from 1874 to 1875.

Career[edit]

Bittó studied law and entered into a legal civil service. During the Revolution of 1848–49, he was a revolutionary and a member of the Diet of Hungary. He emigrated after the defeat of Hungary in 1849 out of the country, but returned in 1851. From 1861 Bittó was a parliamentarian in the newly convened parliament to the Liberal Party of Ferenc Deák.

After the compromise with Austria Bittó was the Deputy Speaker of the House of Representatives between 1869 and 1872. He served as justice minister in the government of Menyhért Lónyay from 1871 to 1872. On March 1, 1874 he was appointed by King Ferenc József prime minister. The office he held only until 2 From March 1875 when he was replaced by Béla Wenckheim. In the era of Kálmán Tisza (1875–1890) he was one of the few former liberal oppositionists (he was the only Prime Minister who later joined to the opposition). From 1899 until his death Bittó was a member of the House of Magnates.

References[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Boldizsár Horvát
Minister of Justice
1871–1872
Succeeded by
Tivadar Pauler
Preceded by
Pál Somssich
Speaker of the House of Representatives
1872–1874
Succeeded by
Béla Perczel
Preceded by
József Szlávy
Prime Minister of Hungary
1874–1875
Succeeded by
Béla Wenckheim