It Won't Be Like This for Long

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"It Won't Be Like This for Long"
Single by Darius Rucker
from the album Learn to Live
Released November 3, 2008
Format CD single
Genre Country
Length 3:39
Label Capitol Nashville
Writer(s) Chris DuBois
Ashley Gorley
Darius Rucker
Producer(s) Frank Rogers
Certification Gold (RIAA)
Darius Rucker singles chronology
"Don't Think I Don't Think About It"
(2008)
"It Won't Be Like This for Long"
(2008)
"Alright"
(2009)

"It Won't Be Like This for Long" is a song co-written and recorded by American singer Darius Rucker, lead vocalist of the rock band Hootie & the Blowfish. It was released in November 2008 as the second from his first country music album Learn to Live. Rucker co-wrote the song with Chris DuBois and Ashley Gorley.

Content[edit]

The song is a mid-tempo mostly accompanied by acoustic guitar and piano. The song describes a couple who have just had a baby, and throughout it chronicles how their lives change by the child's presence. In the first verse, the child is crying at night, keeping both parents awake. The mother then tells the father that evenings will change when the child grows.

In the second verse, the daughter is four years old, and is being taken to preschool. She hangs on to her father's leg because she is afraid, and the teacher tells him "it won't be like this for long". By the third verse and bridge, the father is observing the daughter and realizing that the daughter will soon be grown up, and he will not be able to observe her much longer.

According to Country Weekly magazine, Rucker met with Chris DuBois and Ashley Gorley to write the song.[1] The three songwriters were talking about their kids and "how quickly life changes." As the songwriters were talking, they decided to write the song.

Reception[edit]

The song received a "thumbs down" review from the country music site The 9513. Brady Vercher stated that "the lyric itself is too straightforward to carry much emotional resonance despite Rucker's best efforts." He also considered it derivative of Trace Adkins' early 2008 hit "You're Gonna Miss This", which was also co-written by Ashley Gorley and contains a theme of a parent observing a daughter's growing up.[2] Allen Jacobs of Roughstock gave the song a more favorable review.[3] Jacobs said in his review that "Rucker's butter-smooth vocals catch a country cadence, as his balladeers a promise of improvement in a loved one - and his own life."[3]

Music video[edit]

A music video was released for the song in February 2009. As with his previous two music videos ("Don't Think I Don't Think About It" and "Winter Wonderland"), the video for "It Won't Be Like This for Long" was directed by Wayne Isham.

Chart performance[edit]

The song debuted at number 45 on the Hot Country Songs chart dated November 1, 2008 and peaked at number 1 on the chart dated March 28, 2009 and remained there for the next two weeks.

Chart (2008-2009) Peak
position
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[4] 1
US Billboard Hot 100[5] 36
Canada (Canadian Hot 100)[6] 59

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (2009) Position
US Country Songs (Billboard)[7] 4

Certifications[edit]

Country Certification
(sales thresholds)
United States Gold [8]
Preceded by
"Sweet Thing"
by Keith Urban
Billboard Hot Country Songs
number-one single

March 28-April 11, 2009
Succeeded by
"River of Love"
by George Strait

References[edit]

  1. ^ Conaway, Alanna (2009-04-20). "Story Behind the Song: Fatherhood Inspires a Chart-Topper". Country Weekly 16 (10): 29. 
  2. ^ Vercher, Brady (2008-10-13). "Darius Rucker - "It Won't Be Like This for Long"". The 9513. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  3. ^ a b Jacobs, Allen. "Darius Rucker - "It Won't Be Like This for Long" Single Review". Roughstock. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  4. ^ "Darius Rucker Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot Country Songs for Darius Rucker.
  5. ^ "Darius Rucker Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot 100 for Darius Rucker.
  6. ^ "Darius Rucker Album & Song Chart History" Canadian Hot 100 for Darius Rucker.
  7. ^ "Best of 2009: Country Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 2009. Retrieved December 13, 2009. 
  8. ^ http://riaa.com/goldandplatinumdata.php?table=SEARCH_RESULTS

External links[edit]