Itakura Shigenori

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
In this Japanese name, the family name is "Itakura".
Itakura Shigenori
2nd (Itakura) Lord of Fukōzu
In office
1639–1639
Preceded by Itakura Shigemasa
Succeeded by none
1st Lord of Mikawa-Nakajima
In office
1639–1672
Preceded by none
Succeeded by none
1st (Itakura) Lord of Karasuyama
In office
1672–1673
Preceded by Hori Chikamasa
Succeeded by Itakura Shigetane
5th Kyoto Shoshidai
In office
1668–1670
Preceded by Makino Chikashige
Succeeded by Nagai Naotsune
Personal details
Born 1617
Died July 13, 1673
Nationality Japanese

Itakura Shigenori (板倉 重矩?, November 22, 1617 – July 13, 1673) was a Japanese daimyo of the early Edo period.[1] Shigenori's daimyō family claimed descent from the Shibukawa branch of the Seiwa-Genji. The Itakura identified its clan origins in Mikawa province, and the progeny of Katsuhige (1542–1624), including the descendants of his second son Shigemasa (1588–1638), were known as the elder branch of the clan. Katsuhige was Shingeori's grandfather; and Shigenori was the eldest son of Shigemasa.[2]

Shigenori's youth was spent in Mikawa province. In 1615, Shigenori's father was granted yearly revenues from Mikawa in honor of his warrior conduct during the Siege of Osaka.

Career of shogunate service[edit]

Shigenori was made governor of Osaka Castle[2] and then rōjū.[3] His served for a time as rōjū (1665–1668), and then he left Edo for Kyoto.[4]

He served as the shogun's representative in the capital as the fourth Kyoto shoshidai in the period which spanned July 19, 1668 through April 3, 1670.[1] He returned to Edo for a second term as rōjū (1670–1673).[4] His service to the Tokugawa shogunate was serially rewarded in Fukōzu and Mikawa-Nakajima. In 1672, he was made daimyō of Karasuyama in Shimotsuke province.[2]

His grandfather was the second shoshidai and his uncle was the third shoshidai. Shigenori followed their examples by joining his father as part of the shogunate's army during the Shimabara Rebellion.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Meyer, Eva-Maria. "Gouverneure von Kyôto in der Edo-Zeit." University of Tüebingen (in German).
  2. ^ a b c Papinot, Edmund. (2003). Nobiliare du Japon -- Itakura, pp. 16-17; Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d’histoire et de géographie du Japon; retrieved 2012-11-7.
  3. ^ Murdoch, James. (1996). A History of Japan, p. 172.
  4. ^ a b Toby, Ronald P. (1991). State and Diplomacy in Early Modern Japan: Asia in the Development of the Tokugawa Bakufu, p. 124 n7.

References[edit]

Preceded by
Itakura Shigemasa
2nd Lord of Fukōzu
1639
Succeeded by
none
Preceded by
none
1st Lord of Mikawa-Nakajima
1639-1672
Succeeded by
none
Preceded by
Hori Chikamasa
1st Lord of Karasuyama
1672-1673
Succeeded by
Itakura Shigetane
Preceded by
Makino Chikashige
5th Kyoto Shoshidai
1668-1670
Succeeded by
Nagai Naotsune