Italian Music Awards

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Italian Music Award
Awarded for Outstanding achievements in the Italian music business
Country Italy
Presented by Federation of the Italian Music Industry
First awarded 2001
Last awarded 2003

The Italian Music Awards were an accolade established in 2001 by the Federation of the Italian Music Industry to recognize the achievements in the Italian music business both by domestic and international artists.[1]

The awards were given by an academy composed of 400 people, including music publishers, journalists, deejays, music producers, managers, retailers and consumers.[2]

The first Italian Music Awards ceremony was held on 5 February 2001, to honor musical accomplishments for the period between 1 December 1999 and 30 November 2000,[3] while the fourth and last[4] awards ceremony was held on 15 December 2003.[5] The fifth edition of the awards was initially scheduled to be held in the end of 2004, but after being postponed in February 2004 and then in the Spring of 2004, it was canceled due to the lack of a broadcast agreement with the Italian TV networks.[4][6]

The gap left by the Italian Music Awards was later filled by the Wind Music Awards,[7] established in 2007.[8]

Winners and nominations[edit]

First edition[edit]

In the first edition of the Italian Music Awards, the biggest winner was the pop group Lùnapop, who received 4 awards, followed by Carmen Consoli with two awards.[9][10][11]

Second edition[edit]

During the second edition of the Italian Music Awards, the number of categories was strongly increased.[13] The biggest winners were Vasco Rossi and Elisa, receiving three awards each.[14]

Third edition[edit]

The third Italian Music Awards ceremony was held on 2 December 2002, host by Piero Chiambretti. The biggest winner of the year was Daniele Silvestri, who received four awards.[15][16]

Fourth edition[edit]

The fourth and last edition of the Italian Music Awards was held in December 2003. The biggest winners were Le Vibrazioni, Vasco Rossi and Eros Ramazzotti, receiving two awards each.[5][17][18]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Gloria Pozzi (13 January 2001). "Italian Music Awards: sei candidature per i Lùnapop, cinque per Carmen Consoli". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  2. ^ "A novembre gli Italian Music Awards". Rockol.it. 19 September 2003. Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  3. ^ "Italian Music Awards, parte la fase delle nomination: le osservazioni di Rockol". Rockol.it. 11 December 2000. Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  4. ^ a b Mark Worden (21 July 2007). "The Big Chill". Billboard. p. 20. Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  5. ^ a b Mario Luzzatto Fegiz (16 December 2011). "Oscar della musica italiana a Consoli, Eros e Vibrazioni" (in Italian). Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  6. ^ "Italian Music Awards, slitta ancora (in primavera) la quinta edizione?". Rockol.it. 20 December 2004. Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  7. ^ Mark Worden (6 June 2008). "Promoters Pleased With Italy's Second Wind Awards". Billboard. Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  8. ^ Marinella Venegoni (7 June 2007). "Grammy d’Italia, è qui il business". La Stampa (in Italian). Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  9. ^ Gloria Pozzi (6 February 2001). "Poker dei Lùnapop agli Oscar della musica italiana, vincono anche Consoli e Celentano". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  10. ^ "Le nomination agli Italian Music Awards: quasi un plebiscito per i Lùnapop" (in Italian). Rockol.it. 12 January 2001. Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  11. ^ "Le Nomination del 1° "Italian Music Awards"" (in Italian). www.dirittodautore.it. 12 January 2001. Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  12. ^ "Lùnapop - La biografia" (in Italian). RAI. Retrieved 14 December 2011. 
  13. ^ "Italian Music Awards, annunciate le nomination" (in Italian). www.dirittodautore.it. 26 October 2001. Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  14. ^ Gloria Pozzi (27 November 2001). "Oscar della musica a Vasco ed Elisa". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  15. ^ "Italian Music Awards, vincono Ligabue, Planet Funk e Silvestri" (in Italian). Rockol.it. 2 December 2002. Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  16. ^ Luca Benedetti (27 November 2002). "La notte della musica italiana". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). Retrieved 16 December 2011. 
  17. ^ "Comunicato Stampa: 'Italian Music Awads', le nomination". Rockol.it. 20 October 2003. Retrieved 15 December 2011. 
  18. ^ "Italian Music Awards". qn.quotidiano.net. 16 December 2003. Retrieved 15 December 2011.