Italian electoral law referendum, 2009

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Three referendums on reforming the electoral law were held in Italy on 21-22 June 2009. They were promoted by Mario Segni, Giovanni Guzzetta, Arturo Parisi, Antonio Martino and Daniele Capezzone. With a turnout of 23.31% / 23.84%, the referendums did not reach the necessary quorum of 50% voters, so were not valid.[1]

The three questions were about giving the majority prize to the most voted list in the Chamber of Deputies (question 1, purple ballot) and in the Senate (question 2, yellow ballot) as opposed to the most voted coalition, as is the current law, and about preventing politicians from standing in multiple constituencies at the same time (question 3, green ballot).[2]

The Promoting Committee and Democratic Party (PD) had proposed holding the referendums together with European Parliament elections, whereas The People of Freedom (PdL) as its main ally, the Lega Nord, opposed the referendums and answered that never, in Italian history, an election and a referendum were jointly celebrated.

Several PdL party officials had long supported the referendums, the main long-term goal of the PdL being to transform Italian politics into a two-party system. The PD saw the referendums as an opportunity to overcome its current political hard times and to divide the centre-right.[3][4][5]

Results[edit]

The referendums did not reach the quorum required by law for their validity.[1]

First question[edit]

Italian Chamber of Deputies — Abrogation of the connection between lists and of the attribution of the majority prize to a coalition of lists.[6]

Results
Choice Votes  %
Referendum failed No 2,318,792 22.36%
Yes 8,052,954 77.64%
Valid votes 10.371.746 88.59%
Invalid or blank votes 1,336,486 11.41%
Total votes 2,374,312 100.00%
Turnout required 50.00%
Registered voters/turnout 50,221,071 23.31%
Source: Italian Ministry of the Interior[6]

Second question[edit]

Italian Senate — Abrogation of the connection between lists and of the attribution of the majority prize to a coalition of lists.[7]

Results
Choice Votes  %
Referendum failed No 2,311,350 22.31%
Yes 8,050,362 77.69%
Valid votes 10,361,712 88.51%
Invalid or blank votes 1,345,075 11.49%
Total votes 2,374,312 100.00%
Turnout required 50.00%
Registered voters/turnout 50,221,071 23.31%
Source: Italian Ministry of the Interior[7]

Third question[edit]

Italian Chamber of Deputies — Abrogation of the possibility for a candidate to stand for election in more than one constituency.[8]

Results
Choice Votes  %
Referendum failed No 1,417,819 13.00%
Yes 9,489,791 87.00%
Valid votes 10,907,610 91.10%
Invalid or blank votes 1,065,586 8.90%
Total votes 2,374,312 100.00%
Turnout required 50.00%
Registered voters/turnout 50,221,071 23.84%
Source: Italian Ministry of the Interior[8]

References[edit]