Track gauge in Italy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Italian gauge)
Jump to: navigation, search
Track gauges
By transport mode
Tram · Rapid transit
Miniature · Scale model
By size (list)
Graphic list of track gauges

Minimum
  Fifteen inch 381 mm (15 in)

Narrow
  Two foot and
600 mm
597 mm
600 mm
603 mm
610 mm
(1 ft 11 12 in)
(1 ft 11 58 in)
(1 ft 11 34 in)
(2 ft)
  750 mm,
Bosnian,
Two foot six inch,
800 mm
750 mm
760 mm
762 mm
800 mm
(2 ft 5 12 in)
(2 ft 5 1516 in)
(2 ft 6 in)
(2 ft 7 12 in)
  Swedish three foot,
900 mm,
Three foot
891 mm
900 mm
914 mm
(2 ft11 332 in)
(2 ft 11 716)
(3 ft)
  Metre 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 38 in)
  Three foot six inch,
Cape, CAP, Kyōki
1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
  Four foot six inch 1,372 mm (4 ft 6 in)

  Standard 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)

Broad
  Russian,
Five foot
1,520 mm
1,524 mm
(4 ft 11 2732 in)
(5 ft)
  Irish 1,600 mm (5 ft 3 in)
  Iberian 1,668 mm (5 ft 5 2132 in)
  Indian 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in)
  Brunel 2,140 mm (7 ft 14 in)
Change of gauge
Break-of-gauge · Dual gauge ·
Conversion (list) · Bogie exchange · Variable gauge
By location
North America · South America · Europe
World map, rail gauge by region

Historically, Italy had two unusual dominant track gauges which were legally defined. The gauge of 1,445 mm (4 ft 8 78 in) was used for the national Italian rail network and was very similar to the 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge. Since the 1930s the 1,435 mm gauge, was adopted and gradually replaced the 1,445 mm track gauge. A few isolated 1,445 mm gauge networks survive.

The other gauge, a narrow gauge, was defined at 950 mm (3 ft 1 38 in) and is very similar to 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 38 in) or metre gauge and was thus called "Italian metre gauge".

Historical legal definitions of 1879[edit]

The Milan tramway network, the largest in Italy, runs on Italian broad gauge.

Italian law defined its track gauges from the centres of each rail,[1] rather than the inside edges of the rails, giving some unusual measurements. According to the law of 28 July 1879, the only legal gauges in Italy were 1,500 mm (4 ft 11 116 in), 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 38 in) and measured to the middle of the rail, which corresponds to 1,445 mm (4 ft 8 78 in) and 950 mm (3 ft 1 38 in) inside the rail.

The middle size has 1,000 mm between the centres of the rails, which explains why it is called Italian metre gauge, in spite of it in fact being 950 mm in gauge when measured from the inside of the rails in the way gauges usually are measured in other countries.

A disadvantage of measuring from the centre of the rail is that the width of the rail varies, affecting the gauge. It is easier and more reliable to measure from the inner edges of the rails.

1,445 mm (4 ft 8 78 in) gauge railways[edit]

The following 1,445 mm (4 ft 8 78 in) systems survive today:

1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) or standard gauge railways[edit]

The Italian standard gauge railway system has a total length[2] of 24,227 km (15,054 mi) of which active lines are 16,723 km.[3] The network is recently growing with the construction of the new high-speed rail network.

Italian narrow gauge railways[edit]

In Italy, track gauges of 1,100 mm (3 ft 7 516 in), 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 38 in), 950 mm (3 ft 1 38 in), 850 mm (2 ft 9 1532 in), 760 mm (2 ft 5 1516 in) and 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in) are or were present.

The forementioned 950 mm "Italian metre gauge" was also used in the former Italian colonies Eritrea (Eritrean Railway), Lybia (Italian Libya Railways) and Somalia (Mogadishu-Villabruzzi Railway).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Parovoz". Archived from the original on 2012-07-13. 
  2. ^ Total length of tracks: double tracks are counted twice.
  3. ^ "La rete oggi". RFI Rete Ferroviaria Italiana. Retrieved 15 November 2011.