Italian verbs

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Further information: Italian language and Italian grammar

Italian verbs have a high degree of inflection, the majority of which follow one of three common patterns of conjugation. Conjugation is affected by mood, person, tense, number and occasionally gender.

The three classes of verbs (patterns of conjugation) are distinguished by the endings of the infinitive form of the verb:

  • 1st conjugation: -are (amare, parlare)
  • 2nd conjugation: -ere (credere, ricevere)
    • -arre, -irre and -urre are considered part of the 2nd conjugation, as they are derived from Latin -ere but had lost their internal e after the suffix fused to the stem's vowel (a, i and u).
  • 3rd conjugation: -ire (dormire)
    • 3rd conjugation -ire with infixed -isc- (finire)

Additionally, Italian has a number of irregular and semi-irregular verbs, including essere, avere, andare, stare, dare, fare, and many others.

The suffixes that form the infinitive are usually stressed, except for -ere, which is stressed in some verbs and unstressed in others (e.g. vedere /ve'deːre/ vs prendere /'prɛndere/). A few verbs have a misleading, retracted infinitive, but use their unretracted stem in most conjugations. Fare comes from Latin facere, which can be seen in many of its forms. Similarly, dire ("to say") comes from dīcere, bere ("to drink") comes from bibere and porre ("to put") comes from pōnere.

The Present[edit]

Present (Il presente)[edit]

Used for:

  • events happening in the present
  • habitual actions
  • current states of being and conditions
amare

/am'aːre/

credere

/'kreːdere/

dormire

/dorˈmiːre/

finire

/fi'niːre/

essere

/'ɛssere/

avere

/a'veːre/

andare

/an'daːre/

stare

/'staːre/

dare

/'daːre/

fare

/faːre/

io

/'io/

amo

/'aːmo/

credo

/'kreːdo/

dormo

/'dɔrmo/

finisco

/fi'nisko/

sono

/'soːno/

ho

/'ɔ/

vado (Tuscan: vo)

/'vaːdo/ (/'vɔ/)

sto

/'stɔ/

do

/'dɔ/

faccio (Tuscan: fo)

/'fattʃo/ (/'fɔ/)

tu

/'tu/

ami

/'aːmi/

credi

/'kreːdi/

dormi

/'dɔrmi/

finisci

/fi'niʃʃi/

sei

/'sɛi/

hai

/'ai/

vai

/'vai/

stai

/'stai/

dai

/'dai/

fai

/'fai/

lui / lei / Lei

/'lui lɛi/

ama

/'ːama/

crede

/'kreːde/

dorme

/'dɔrme/

finisce

/fi'niʃʃe/

è

/'ɛ/

ha

/'a/

va

/'va/

sta

/'sta/

/'da/

fa

/'fa/

noi

/'noi/

amiamo

/a'mjaːmo/

crediamo

/kre'djaːmo/

dormiamo

/dor'mjaːmo/

finiamo

/fi'njaːmo/

siamo

/'sjaːmo/

abbiamo

/ab'bjaːmo/

andiamo

/an'djaːmo/

stiamo

/'stjaːmo/

diamo

/'djaːmo/

facciamo

/fat'tʃaːmo/

voi / Voi

/'voi/

amate

/a'maːte/

credete

/kre'deːte/

dormite

/dor'miːte/

finite

/fi'niːte/

siete

/'sjɛːte/

avete

/a'veːte/

andate

/an'daːte/

state

/'staːte/

date

/'daːte/

fate

/'faːte/

loro

/'loːro/

amano

/'aːmano/

credono

/'kreːdono/

dormono

/'dɔrmono/

finiscono

/fi'niskono/

sono

/'soːno/

hanno

/'anno/

vanno

/'vanno/

stanno

/'stanno/

danno

/'danno/

fanno

/'fanno/

  • Io credo "I believe"
  • Lei dorme "She sleeps"

Pronouns are not obligatory in Italian, and they are normally only used when they are stressed. The conjugation of the verb is normally used to show the subject.

  • Credo "I believe"
  • Credi "You believe"
  • Dorme "He/she sleeps"

The pronoun tu (and corresponding verb forms) is used in the singular towards children, family members and close friends (cf. "thou"), whereas voi is used in the same manner in the plural (cf. "ye"). The pronouns lei and voi are used towards older people, strangers and very important or respectable people. Note that lei can also mean "she".

  • Lei va "You are going (formal)"
  • Tu vai "You are going (informal)"
  • Vai "You are going (informal)"
  • Va "You are going (formal)"

The irregular verb essere has the same form in the first person singular and third person plural.

  • Sono "I am / They are"

Vado and faccio are the standard Italian first person singular forms of the verbs andare and fare, but vo and fo are used in the Tuscan dialect.

The infix -isc- varies in pronunciation between /isk/ and /ʃʃ/, depending on the following vowel. Similar alterations are found in other verbs:

  • leggo /'lɛɡɡo/ "I read" vs. leggi /'lɛddʒi/ "you read"
  • dico "I say" /'diːko/ vs. "dici" /'ditʃi/ "you say"
  • etc.

The Past[edit]

Present perfect (Il passato prossimo)[edit]

The present perfect is used for single actions or events (stamattina sono andato in scuola "I went to school this morning"), or change in state (s'è arrabbiato quando ho detto quello "he got angry when I told him that"), contrasting with the imperfect which is used for habits (andavo in bicicletta alla scuola ogni mattina "I went to school by bike every morning"), or repeated actions, not happening a specific time (s'arrabbiava ogni volta che qualcuno gli diceva quello "he got angry every time someone told him that"). Italians—with the notable exception of Southern Italy—typically use the present perfect also when referring to ancient facts, in a similar fashion to French.

The past participle[edit]

The past participle is needed to form the present perfect. Regular verbs follow a very easy pattern, but there are many verbs with an irregular past participle.

  • Verbs in -are add -ato to the stem: parlato, stato
  • Verbs in -ire add -ito to the stem: partito, finito
  • Some verbs in -ere add -uto to the stem: creduto
  • Other verbs in -ere are irregular, they mutate the stem and add -o, -so, -sto or -tto to the stem: preso (from prendere), letto (from leggere), rimasto (from rimanere)
  • Fare and dire do exactly the same thing: fatto (from fare), detto (from dire)
  • Venire has venuto and bere has bevuto
  • Stare and essere both have stato.

Verbs with "avere"[edit]

All transitive verbs and most intransitive verbs form the present perfect by combining the auxiliary verb avere "to have" in the present tense with the past participle of the transitive verb.

parlare
io ho parlato
tu hai parlato
lui / lei / Lei ha parlato
noi abbiamo parlato
voi / Voi avete parlato
loro hanno parlato

The past participle agrees in gender and number with third person object pronouns, if these precede the verb, following the same pattern of nouns and adjectives:

  • -o masculine singular
  • -a feminine singular
  • -i masculine plural
  • -e feminine plural

When not agreeing, the participle always ends in -o.

  • Il ragazzo che ho visto "The boy I saw'
  • L'ho visto "I saw him'
  • Ho visto il ragazzo "I saw the boy'
  • La ragazza che ho visto "The girl I saw'
  • L'ho vista "I saw her'
  • Ho visto (!) la ragazza "I saw the girl'

Verbs with "essere"[edit]

A small number of intransitive verbs, namely essere itself and verbs indicating motion (venire "to come", "andare to go, arrivare "to arrive", etc.) use the auxiliary verb essere "to be" instead of avere. The past participle in this agrees with gender and number of the subject.

arrivare
io sono arrivato/–a
tu sei arrivato/–a
lui / lei / Lei è arrivato/–a
noi siamo arrivati/–e
voi / Voi siete arrivati/–e
loro sono arrivati/–e

Reflexive verbs always use essere, but their past participle agrees with the subject or with third person object pronouns, if these precede the verb.

  • Mi sono lavato/–a "I washed myself"
  • Ci siamo visti/–e "We saw each other"
  • Si è lavato le gambe "He washed his legs"
  • Se l'è lavate, le gambe "He washed them, his legs"
  • Ci siamo parlati "We talked to each other"

Imperfect (L’imperfetto)[edit]

The imperfect is used for:

  • repeated or habitual actions in the past
  • ongoing actions in the past and ongoing actions in the past that are eventually interrupted
  • weather time and age in the past
  • states of being and conditions in the past

The Imperfect is, in most cases, formed by taking the stem along with the thematic vowel and adding v + the ending of the -are verbs in the present tense (with -amo instead of -iamo). There are no irregular verbs in the Imperfect, with the exception of essere and the retracted verbs, which use their full stems (i.e. dicevo for dire, facevo for fare, bevevo for bere and ponevo for porre).

parlare vendere capire finire essere avere andare stare fare
io parlavo

/par'laːvo/

vendevo

/ven'deːvo/

capivo

/ka'piːvo/

finivo

/fi'niːvo/

ero

/'ɛːro/

avevo

/a'veːvo/

andavo

/an'daːvo/

stavo

/'staːvo/

facevo

/fa'tʃeːvo/

tu parlavi

/par'laːvi/

vendevi

/ven'deːvi/

capivi

/ka'piːvi/

finivi

/fi'niːvi/

eri

/'ɛːri/

avevi

/a'veːvi/

andavi

/an'daːvi/

stavi

/'staːvi/

facevi

/fa'tʃeːvi/

lui / lei / Lei parlava

/par'laːva/

vendeva

/ven'deːva/

capiva

/ka'piːva/

finiva

/fi'niːva/

era

/'ɛːra/

aveva

/a'veːva/

andava

/an'daːva/

stava

/'staːva/

faceva

/fa'tʃeːva/

noi parlavamo

/parla'vaːmo/

vendevamo

/vende'vaːmo/

capivamo

/kapi'vaːmo/

finivamo

/fini'vaːmo/

eravamo

/era'vaːmo/

avevamo

/ave'vaːmo/

andavamo

/anda'vaːmo/

stavamo

/sta'vaːmo/

facevamo

/fatʃe'vaːmo/

voi / Voi parlavate

/parla'vaːte/

vendevate

/vende'vaːte/

capivate

/kapi'vaːte/

finivate

/fini'vaːte/

eravate

/era'vaːte/

avevate

/ave'vaːte/

andavate

/anda'vaːte/

stavate

/sta'vaːte/

facevate

/fatʃe'vaːte/

loro parlavano

/par'laːvano/

vendevano

/ven'deːvano/

capivano

/ka'piːvano/

finivano

/fi'niːvano/

erano

/'ɛːrano/

avevano

/a'veːvano/

andavano

/an'daːvano/

stavano

/'staːvano/

facevano

/fa'tʃeːvano/

  • Loro parlavano "They used to speak"

Past absolute (Il passato remoto)[edit]

The Absolute Past has almost exactly the same function as the Present Perfect. It is used for events which are distant from the present and no longer directly affect it, for example when telling a story, whereas the Present Perfect is used for more recent events which may have a direct impact on the present. The Absolute Past may at all time be replaced with the Present Perfect (but not vice versa). In most of Southern Italy, it is still used commonly in spoken language, whereas in Northern Italy and Sardinia it is restricted to written language.

Like the past participle, regular verbs are very predictable, but many verbs (mainly ending in -ere) are irregular.

  • Regular verbs are formed by taking the stem and the stressed thematic vowel and adding -i, -sti, -, -mmo, -ste,-rono. Verb in -are have in the third person singular instead of the expected .
    • parlare: parlai, parlasti, parlò, parlammo, parlaste, parlarono
    • credere: credei, credesti, credé, credemmo, credeste, crederono
    • partire: partii, partisti, partì, partimmo, partiste, partirono
  • Irregular verbs have an irregular stem to which the exits -i, -e, -ero are added to form the first singular, third singular and third plural forms respectively. The second singular, first plural and second plural forms follow the regular pattern (dire, fare, bere, porre use their long stems here, as usual).
    • rompere: ruppi, rompesti, ruppe, rompemmo, rompeste, ruppero
    • vedere: vidi, vedesti, vide, vedemmo, vedeste, videro
    • dire: dissi, dicesti, disse, dicemmo, diceste, dissero
  • Some verbs in -ere that follow the regular pattern (-ei, -esti, etc.) have an alternative form in -etti which follows the irregular pattern.
    • credere: credetti (=credei), credesti, credette (=credé), credemmo, credeste, credettero (=crederono)
  • The majority of verbs follow one of the above patterns. Essere, stare and fare however are completely irregular.
parlare vendere partire finire essere avere andare stare dare fare
io parlai

/par'lai/

vendei or vendetti

/ven'dei/ or /ven'dɛtti/

partii

/par'tii/

finii

/fi'nii/

fui

/'fui/

ebbi

/'ɛbbi/

andai

/an'dai/

stetti

/'stɛtti/

diedi or detti

/'djɛːdi/ or /'dɛtti/

feci

/'fɛːtʃi/

tu parlasti

/par'lasti/

vendesti

/ven'desti/

partisti

/par'tisti/

finisti

/fi'nisti/

fosti

/'fosti/

avesti

/a'vesti/

andasti

/an'dasti/

stesti

/'stɛsti/

desti

/'dɛsti/

facesti

/fa'tʃesti/

lui / lei / Lei parlò

/par'lɔ/

vendé or vendette

/ven'de/ or /ven'dɛtte/

partì

/par'ti/

finì

/fi'ni/

fu

/'fu/

ebbe

/'ɛbbe/

andò

/an'dɔ/

stette

/'stɛtte/

diede or dette

/'djɛːde/ or /'dɛtte/

fece

/'fɛːtʃe/

noi parlammo

/par'lammo/

vendemmo

/ven'demmo/

partimmo

/par'timmo/

finimmo

/fi'nimmo/

fummo

/'fummo/

avemmo

/a'vemmo/

andammo

/an'dammo/

stemmo

/'stɛmmo/

demmo

/'dɛmmo/

facemmo

/fa'tʃemmo/

voi / Voi parlaste

/par'laste/

vendeste

/ven'deste/

partiste

/par'tiste/

finiste

/fi'niste/

foste

/'foste/

aveste

/a'veste/

andaste

/an'daste/

steste

/'stɛste/

deste

/'dɛste/

faceste

/fa'tʃeste/

loro parlarono

/par'laːrono/

venderono or vendettero

/ven'deːrono/ or /ven'dɛttero/

partirono

/par'tiːrono/

finirono

/fi'niːrono/

furono

/'fuːrono/

ebbero

/'ɛbbero/

andarono

/an'daːrono/

stettero

/'stɛttero/

diedero' or dettero

/'djɛːdero/ or /'dɛttero/

fecero

/'fɛːtʃero/

Past Perfect (Il trapassato prossimo)[edit]

Used for activities done prior to another activity (translates to constructions such as "had eaten", "had seen")

The Past Perfect is formed the same as the Present Perfect, but with the auxiliary verb in the Imperfect.

  • parlare: avevo parlato
  • arrivare: ero arrivato/–a

In literary language, an Absolute Perfect exists which uses the Absolute Past of the auxiliaries, and which is used for activities done prior to another activity which is described with the Absolutive Past

  • parlare: ebbi parlato
  • arrivare: fui arrivato/–a

The Future[edit]

Future (Il futuro semplice)[edit]

The future is used for events that will happen in the future. It is formed by adding the forms of avere to the infinitive (with abbiamo and avete retracted to -emo and -ete respectively). Sometimes the infinitive undergoes some changes.

  • Firstly, the infinitive always loses its final e.
  • Secondly, verbs in -are end in -er, not in -ar
  • Stare, dare, fare however retain star-, dar-, far-.
  • Most irregular verbs lose the letter before the last r altogether (e.g. avr- for avere and andr- for andare). Clusters -nr- and -lr- are simplified to -rr (e.g. verr- for venire).
  • Retraced infinitives are retained (e.g. porr- for porre)
  • Essere has sar-
parlare prendere partire finire essere avere andare stare fare
io parlerò

/parle'rɔ/

prenderò

/prende'rɔ/

partirò

/parti'rɔ/

finirò

/fini'rɔ/

sarò

/sa'rɔ/

avrò

/a'vrɔ/

andrò

/an'drɔ/

starò

/sta'rɔ/

farò

/fa'rɔ/

tu parlerai

/parle'rai/

prenderai

/prende'rai/

partirai

/parti'rai/

finirai

/fini'rai/

sarai

/sa'rai/

avrai

/a'vrai/

andrai

/an'drai/

starai

/sta'rai/

farai

/fa'rai/

lui / lei / Lei parlerà

/parle'ra/

prenderà

/prende'ra/

partirà

/parti'ra/

finirà

/fini'ra/

sarà

/sa'ra/

avrà

/a'vra/

andrà

/an'dra/

starà

/sta'ra/

farà

/fa'ra/

noi parleremo

/parle'reːmo/

prenderemo

/prende'reːmo/

partiremo

/parti'reːmo/

finiremo

/fini'reːmo/

saremo

/sa'reːmo/

avremo

/a'vreːmo/

andremo

/an'dreːmo/

staremo

/sta'reːmo/

faremo

/fa'reːmo/

voi / Voi parlerete

/parle'reːte/

prenderete

/prende'reːte/

partirete

/parti'reːte/

finirete

/fini'reːte/

sarete

/sa'reːte/

avrete

/a'vreːte/

andrete

/an'dreːte/

starete

/sta'reːte/

farete

/fa'reːte/

loro parleranno

/parle'ranno/

prenderanno

/prende'ranno/

partiranno

/parti'ranno/

finiranno

/fini'ranno/

saranno

/sa'ranno/

avranno

/a'vranno/

andranno

/an'dranno/

staranno

/sta'ranno/

faranno

/fa'ranno/

Future perfect (Il futuro anteriore)[edit]

Used for events that will have happened when or after something else happens in the future.

The Future Perfect is formed the same as the Present Perfect, but with the auxiliary verb in the Future.

  • parlare: avrò parlato
  • arrivare: sarò arrivato/–a

The Conditional[edit]

Conditional (Il condizionale presente)[edit]

Used for:

  • events that are dependent upon other event occurring
  • politely asking for something (like in English, Could I please have a glass of water?)

The conditional is formed by taking the root of the Future (i.e. an adapted form of the infinitive) and adding the Absolutive Past forms of avere (with ebbi, avesti, avemmo, aveste retracted to -ei, -esti, -emmo, -este resp.).

-are -ere -ire
io lavorerei

/lavore'rɛi/

prenderei

/prende'rɛi/

aprirei

/apri'rɛi/

tu lavoreresti

/lavore'resti/

prenderesti

/prende'resti/

apriresti

/apri'resti/

lui / lei / Lei lavorerebbe

/lavore'rɛbbe/

prenderebbe

/prende'rɛbbe/

aprirebbe

/apri'rɛbbe/

noi lavoreremmo

/lavore'remmo/

prenderemmo

/prende'remmo/

apriremmo

/apri'remmo/

voi / Voi lavorereste

/lavore'reste/

prendereste

/prende'reste/

aprireste

/apri'reste/

loro lavorerebbero

/lavore'rɛbbero/

prenderebbero

/prende'rɛbbero/

aprirebbero

/apri'rɛbbero/

Past Conditional (Il condizionale passato)[edit]

Used for events that would, could or should have occurred.

The Conditional Perfect is formed the same as the Present Perfect, but with the auxiliary verb in the Conditional.

  • parlare: avrei parlato
  • arrivare: sarei arrivato/–a

The Subjunctive[edit]

Present Subjunctive (Il congiuntivo presente)[edit]

Used for subordinate clauses of the present indicative (il presente) to express opinion, possibility, desire, or doubt.

The subjunctive is formed:

  • For regular verbs in -are, by taking the root and adding -i, -ino for all the singular forms and the third plural respectively.
  • For most other regular and semi-regular verbs, by taking the first person singular of the Present Indicative and replacing the final -o with -a, ano for all the singular forms and the third plural respectively.
  • For a few irregular verbs, by taking the first person plural of the Present Indicative and replacing stressed -amo with unstressed -a, ano for all the singular forms and the third plural respectively.
  • For all verbs, the first person plural is identical to the Present Indicative.
  • For all verbs, the second person plural is the first person plural with -te instead of -mo.

The subjunctive is almost always preceded by the conjunctive word che (or compounds such as perché, affinché, etc.)

parlare vedere partire finire essere avere andare stare fare
io che parli

/'parli/

che veda

/'veːda/

che parta

/'parta/

che finisca

/fi'niska/

che sia

/'sia/

che abbia

/'abbja/

che vada

/'vaːda/

che stia

/'stia/

che faccia

/'fattʃa/

tu che parli

/'parli/

che veda

/'veːda/

che parta

/'parta/

che finisca

/fi'niska/

che sia

/'sia/

che abbia

/'abbja/

che vada

/'vaːda/

che stia

/'stia/

che faccia

/'fattʃa/

lui / lei / Lei che parli

/'parli/

che veda

/'veːda/

che parta

/'parta/

che finisca

/fi'niska/

che sia

/'sia/

che abbia

/'abbja/

che vada

/'vaːda/

che stia

/'stia/

che faccia

/'fattʃa/

noi che parliamo

/par'ljaːmo/

che vediamo

/ve'djːamo/

che partiamo

/par'tjaːmo/

che finiamo

/fi'njaːmo/

che siamo

/'sjaːmo/

che abbiamo

/ab'bjaːmo/

che andiamo

/an'djaːmo/

che stiamo

/'stjaːmo/

che facciamo

/fat'tʃaːmo/

voi/ Voi che parliate

/par'ljaːte/

che vediate

/ve'djaːte/

che partiate

/par'tjaːte/

che finiate

/fi'njaːte/

che siate

/'sjaːte/

che abbiate

/ab'bjaːte/

che andiate

/an'djaːte/

che stiate

/'stjaːte/

che facciate

/fat'tʃaːte/

loro che parlino

/'parlino/

che vedano

/'veːdano/

che partano

/'partano/

che finiscano

/fi'niskano/

che siano

/'siano/

che abbiano

/'abbjano/

che vadano

/'vaːdano/

che stiano

/'stiano/

che facciano

/'fattʃan/

Imperfect Subjunctive (Il congiuntivo imperfetto)[edit]

Used for subordinate clauses of the imperfect indicative (l’imperfetto) or the conditional.

The Imperfect Subjunctive is formed by taking the infinitive, and replacing "re" with -ssi, -ssi, -sse, -ssimo, -ste, -ssero.

-are -ere -ire
io che parlassi

/par'lassi/

che leggessi

/led'dʒessi/

che capissi

/ka'pissi/

tu che parlassi

/par'lassi/

che leggessi

/led'dʒessi/

che capissi

/ka'pissi/

lui / lei / Lei che parlasse

/par'lasse/

che leggesse

/led'dʒesse/

che capisse

/ka'pisse/

noi che parlassimo

/par'lassimo/

che leggessimo

/led'dʒessimi/

che capissimo

/ka'pissimo/

voi / Voi che parlaste

/par'laste/

che leggeste

/led'dʒeste/

che capiste

/ka'piste/

loro che parlassero

/par'lassero/

che leggessero

/led'dʒessero/

che capissero

/ka'pissero/

Past Subjunctive (Il congiuntivo passato)[edit]

Used for subordinate clauses of the imperfect indicative (l’imperfetto) or the conditional.

The Subjunctive Perfect is formed the same as the Present Perfect, but with the auxiliary verb in the Subjunctive Present.

  • parlare: che abbia parlato
  • arrivare: che sia arrivato/–a

Pluperfect Subjunctive (Il congiuntivo trapassato)[edit]

The Subjunctive Pluperfect is formed the same as the Present Perfect, but with the auxiliary verb in the Present.

  • parlare: ch'avessi parlato
  • arrivare: che fossi arrivato/–a

The Imperative[edit]

Imperative (imperativo)[edit]

Used for giving commands.

The second person singular Imperative is formed:

  • For regular verbs in -are, by taking the third person singular of the Present. (e.g. parla!)
  • For other regular verbs, by taking the second person singular of the Present. (e.g. prendi!, parti!, finisci!)
  • For andare, dare and stare, by taking either of these. (e.g. va!/vai! for andare)
  • For a few irregular verbs, by taking the singular form of the Subjunctive and replacing final -a with -i (e.g. vogli! for volere)
  • Dire has dì!

The polite form of the singular is identical to the Subjunctive. Objective personal pronouns are placed before the verb, unlike other forms of the imperative which have these after the verb (e.g. mi aiuti! "please help me!" vs. aiutami! "help me!"; se ne vada via! "Please go away" vs. vattene via! (vattene = va + te + ne); etc.)
The first person plural (used for suggestion, e.g. andiamo! "Let's go!") is identical to the Present Indicative, but allows pronominal suffixes (e.g. andiamocene "Let's go away!" vs. ce ne andiamo "We are leaving").
The second person plural is usually identical to the Present Indicative, but in a few irregular cases to the Present Subjunctive.

parlare leggere partire finire essere avere andare stare fare
(tu) parla!

/'parla/

leggi!

/'lɛddʒi/

parti!

/'parti/

finisci!

/fi'niʃʃi/

sii!

/'sii/

abbi!

/'abbi/

vai! or va!

/'vai/ or /'va/

stai! or sta!

/'stai/ or /'sta/

fai! or fa!

/'fai/ or /'fa/

(Lei)"" parli!

/'parli/

legga!

/'lɛɡɡa/

parta!

/'parta/

finisca!

/fi'niska/

sia!

/'sia/

abbia!

/'abbja/

vada!

/'vaːda/

stia!

/'stia/

faccia!

/'fattʃa/

(noi) parliamo!

/par'ljaːmo/

leggiamo!

/lɛd'dʒaːmo/

partiamo!

/par'tjaːmo/

finiamo!

/fi'njaːmo/

siamo!

/'sjaːmo/

abbiamo!

/ab'bjaːmo/

andiamo!

/an'djaːmo/

stiamo!

/'stjaːmo/

facciamo!

/fat'tʃaːmo/

(voi) parlate!

/par'laːte/

leggete!

/lɛd'dʒeːte/

partite!

/par'tiːte/

finite!

/fi'niːte/

siate!

/'sjaːte/

abbiate!

/ab'bjaːte/

andate!

/an'daːte/

state!

/'staːte/

fate!

/'faːte/

  • Parti! "Leave!"
  • Partiamo "Let's leave"

Negative imperative[edit]

The second person singular uses the infinitive instead of its usual form in the negative, while other forms remain unchanged.

-are -ere -ire
(tu) non parlare non leggere non partire
(Lei) non parli non legga non parta
(noi) non parliamo non leggiamo non partiamo
(voi) non parlate non leggete non partite
  • Non partire "Don't leave"

Nominal Verb forms[edit]

Italian verbs have three additional forms, known as nominal forms, because they can be used as nouns or adjectives, rather than as verbs.

  • The past participle has been discussed above.
  • The present participle is used as an adjective or a noun describing someone who is busy doing something. For example, parlante means "talking" or "someone who is talking".
    • Verbs in -are form the present participle by adding -ante to the stem.
    • Verbs in -ere and -ire form the present participle by adding -ente /'ɛnte/ to the stem.
    • Fare, dire, bere, porre use their long stems to form resp. facente, dicente, bevente, ponente.
    • Essere has ente.
  • The gerund (gerundio) is the adverbial form of the present participle, and has a very broad use. For example: parlando can translate as talking / while talking / by talking / because of one's talking / through talking / ….
    • The gerund is identical to the present participle, but with final -te replaced by -do.
    • Essere by exception has essendo, not the expected *endo.

The gerund can be used in combination with the verb stare to create continuous expressions. These are similar to English continuous expressions (e.g. I am talking) but they are used much less extensively as in English.

  • Sto lavorando "I'm working"
  • Stavo mangiando "I was eating"

Keep in mind that the gerund is an adverb, not an adjective, and so it does not agree in gender and number with anything. The ending is always -o.

  • La ragazza sta mangiando "The girl is eating"

Like the imperative, all nominal verb forms (including the infinitive) have their objective personal pronouns suffixed rather than placed before them.

  • mi parla > parlarmi; (parlatomi); (parlantemi); parlandomi; parlami!
  • si pone > porsi; (postosi); (ponentesi); ponendosi; poniti!
  • me lo dice > dirmelo; (dettomelo); (dicentemelo); dicendomelo; dimmelo!
  • se ne va via > andarsene via; (andatosene via); (andantesene via); andandosene via; vattene via!

Irregular verbs[edit]

Many Italian verbs are irregular:

  • dire: Pr. dico, dici, dice, diciamo, dite, dicono; Ps.P ho detto; Impf. dicevo; Ps.R dissi, diceste; f. dirò; Sg.Pr. dica, diciamo; Sg.Impf. dicessi; Imp. dì!, dica!, diciamo!, dite!; dicente
  • bere: Pr. bevo /'beːvo/, bevi, beve, beviamo, bevete, bevono; Ps.P ho bevuto; Impf. bevevo; Ps.R bevvi/bevetti, bevesti; f. berrò; Sg.Pr. che beva, che beviamo; Sg.Impf. che bevessi; Imp. bevi!, beva!, beviamo!, bevete!; bevente
  • volere: Pr. voglio /'vɔʎʎo/, vuoi /'vwɔi/, vuole, vogliamo, volete, vogliono; Ps.P ho voluto;[1] Impf. volevo; Ps.R volli/volsi /'vɔlsi 'volli/, volesti; f. vorrò; Sg.Pr. che voglia, che vogliamo; Sg.Impf. che volessi; Imp. vogli!, voglia!, vogliamo!, vogliate!; volente
  • sapere: Pr. so /'sɔ/, sai, sa, sappiamo, sapete, sanno; Ps.P ho saputo; Impf. sapevo; Ps.R seppi /'sɛppi/, sapesti; f. saprò; Sg.Pr. che sappia, che sappiamo; Sg.Impf. che sapessi; Imp. sappi!, sappia!, sappiamo!, sapete!; sapente
  • potere: Pr. posso /'pɔsso/, puoi /'pwɔi/, può, possiamo, potete, possono; Ps.P ho potuto;[1] Impf. potevo; Ps.R potei, potesti; f. potrò; Sg.Pr. che possa, che possiamo; Sg.Impf. che potessi; Imp. possi!, possa!, possiamo!, possiate!; potente
  • dovere: Pr. devo/debbo /'deːvo 'debbo/, devi, deve, dobbiamo, dovete, devono/debbono; Ps.P ho dovuto;[1] Impf. dovevo; Ps.R dovei/dovetti, dovesti; f. dobrò; Sg.Pr. che debba, che dobbiamo; Sg.Impf. che dovessi; Imp. devi!, debba!, dobbiamo!, dovete!; *dovente
  • porre: Pr. pongo /'poŋɡo/, poni /'poːni/, pone, poniamo, ponete, pongono; Ps.P ho posto /'posto/; Impf. ponevo; Ps.R posi /'poːsi/, ponesti; f. porrò; Sg.Pr. che ponga, che poniamo; Sg.Impf. che ponessi; Imp. poni!, ponga!, poniamo!, ponete!; ponente
  • venire: Pr. vengo /'vɛŋɡo/, vieni /'vjɛːni/, viene, veniamo, venite, vengono; Ps.P sono venuto/–a; Impf. venivo; Ps.R venni /'vɛnne/, venesti; f. verrò; Sg.Pr. che venga, che veniamo; Sg.Impf. che venisse; Imp. vieni!, venga!, veniamo!, venite!; venente
  • tenere: like venire (Ps.R tenni, tenesti)
  • rimanere: Pr. rimango, rimani, rimane, rimaniamo, rimanete, rimangono; Ps.P sono rimasto/–a; Impf. rimanevo; Ps.R rimasi, rimanesti; f. rimarrò; Sg.Pr. che rimanga, che rimaniamo; Sg.Impf. che rimanessi; Imp. rimani!, rimanga!, rimaniamo, rimanete!; rimanente
  • morire: Pr. muoio /'mwɔjo/, muori /'mwɔːri/, muore, moriamo, morite, muoiono; Ps.P sono morto/–a /'mɔrto/; Impf. morivo; Ps.R morii, moristi; f. morirò/morrò; Sg.Pr. che muoia, che moriamo; Sg.Impf. che morissi; Imp. mouri!, muoia!, moriamo!, morite!; morente
  • See Italian irregular verbs in English Wiktionary for others.
  1. ^ a b c These verbs always use the auxiliary verb avere to form the perfect tenses when on their own, however when used as modally, they either take avere or follow the verb they refer to (if the auxiliary verb is essere, the past participle optionally agrees with the subject): non sono potuto(/–a) venire / non ho potuto venire "I wasn't able to come"; sono voluto(/–a) partire / ho voluto partire "I wanted to leave"