Italians of Romania

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The Genoese Lighthouse
Italians in 2002 Romania

The Italian Romanians are people of Italian descent who reside, or have moved to Romania.

Characteristics[edit]

They are an ethnic minority in Romania, numbering 3,288 people according to the 2002 census. Italians are fairly dispersed throughout the country, even though there is a higher number of them in the western parts of the country (particularly Timiş County), and in the Municipality of Bucharest.

As an officially-recognised ethnic minority, Italians have one seat reserved in the Romanian Chamber of Deputies.

In recent years, the number of Italians living in Romania has increased substantially. As of November 2007, there are some 12,000 Italians in and around Timişoara.[1] About 3,000 square kilometres of land (2% of the agricultural land of Romania) have been bought by Italians.[1]

History[edit]

The territory of today's Romania has been part of the Italians' (especially Genoese and Venetians) trade routes on the Danube since at least the 13th century. They founded several ports on the Danube, including Vicina (near Isaccea), Sfântu Gheorghe, San Giorgio (Giurgiu) and Calafat.

During the 19th and 20th centuries, many Italians from Western Austria-Hungary settled in Transylvania. During the interwar period, some Italians settled in Dobruja.

After 1880, Italians from Friuli and Veneto settled in Greci, Cataloi and Măcin in Northern Dobruja. Most of them worked in the granite quarries in the Măcin Mountains, some became farmers[2] and others worked in road building.[3]

The Genoese Lighthouse (Farul Genovez) in Constanţa[edit]

Soaring 26 feet (7.9 m), a lighthouse called Farul Genovez was built in 1860 by the "Danubius and Black Sea Company" to honor Genoese merchants who established a flourishing sea trade community in Constanza in the 13th century.

Notable Italians of Romania[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b (French) Mirel Bran, "La Roumanie, ses Italiens, ses Chinois...", Le Monde, November 28, 2007
  2. ^ Mihalcea, Alexandru (2005-01-21). "150 de ani de istorie comuna. Italienii din Dobrogea -mica Italie a unor mesteri mari". România Liberă (in Romanian). Archived from the original on June 7, 2006. Retrieved 2007-04-29. 
  3. ^ Tereza Stratilesco (1907), From Carpathian to Pindus, Boston: J. W. Luce, OCLC 4837380 
  4. ^ (ro)

See also[edit]

External links[edit]