Ivanhoé

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Ivanhoe (disambiguation).
Mademoiselle Lemoule as Léila

Ivanhoé is an 1826 pastiche opera in three acts with music by Gioachino Rossini to a French-language libretto by Émile Deschamps and Gabriel-Gustave de Wailly, after Walter Scott's novel of the same name. The music was adapted, with the composer's permission, by the music-publisher Antonio Pacini from Rossini's operas, namely Semiramide, La Cenerentola, La gazza ladra, and Tancredi in order to introduce his music to Paris. An examination of the score shows that Pacini also used music from Bianca e Faliero, Armida, Maometto II, Aureliano in Palmira, Sigismondo, Torvaldo e Dorliska, Mosè in Egitto and an amount of newly composed music including fanfares and the gallop that was later to become famous from its inclusion in Guglielmo Tell. The work was premiered on 15 September 1826, at the Odéon Theatre.[1][2]

It was performed in England in 1829 as The Maid of Judah with music arranged by Michael Rophino Lacy who also translated and revised the original libretto by Deschamps and de Wailly. The Lacy version was also performed in New York at the Park Theatre in 1832.[3][4] The first performance of Ivanhoé in modern times was given at the Festival della Valle d'Itria in 2001.[5]

Roles[edit]

Role Voice type Premiere cast, 15 September 1826
(Conductor: -)[4]
Ivanhoé tenor Lecomte
Léila soprano Lemoule
Brian de Boisguilbert bass Leclerc
Ismael baritone Léon
Cédric baritone V Adolphe
Le Marquis Lucas de Beaumanoir bass Charles
Albert de Malvoisin tenor Peyronnet
A herald tenor Masson
Thierry silent

Recordings[edit]

  • Rossini: Ivanhoé – Simon Edwards (Ivanhoé), Inga Balabanova (Leila), Soon-Won Kang (Brian de Boisguilbert), Filippo Morace (Ismaele), Massimiliano Chiarolla (Cedric); Bratislava Chamber Choir and the Orchestra Internazionale d'Italia conducted by Paolo Arrivabeni. Live recording from the 2001 performance at the Festival della Valle d'Itria. Label: Dynamic CDS397

References[edit]

  1. ^ Osborne, Richard (1986). Rossini. London: Dent. pp. 72–3. ISBN 0-460-03179-1. 
  2. ^ Everist, Mark (2002). Music Drama at the Paris Odéon, 18241828. pp. 182-187. University of California Press. ISBN 0520928903
  3. ^ The Theatrical observer and, Daily bills of the play (Volume 1832 v. 3 no.3361-3445:(Sep 22,1832-Dec 31,1832))
  4. ^ a b Casaglia, Gherardo (2005). "Ivanhoé". Almanacco Amadeus. Retrieved 5 November 2013 (Italian).
  5. ^ Pugliaro, Giorgio (ed.) (2007). Opera 2007. Annuario dell'opera lirica in Italia, p. 333. EDT srl. ISBN 8860401828 (Italian)

External links[edit]