Ivaniš Berislavić

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Despot Ivaniš
Ivaniš Berislavić
Ivan Berislavić
Serbian Despot
Despot of Serbia
Reign 1504–1514
Predecessor Jovan Branković
Successor Stjepan Berislavić
Spouse Jelena Jakšić
Full name
Ivaniš Berislavić
House Berislavići Grabarski
Religion Catholic

Ivaniš Berislavić (Latin: Joannes Berizlo) was the Despot of the Kingdom of Serbia (regni Rascie despotus[1]) from 1504 to 1514.

Background[edit]

Ivaniš Berislavić was a member of the House of Berislavić, a Croatian noble family from Slavonia, subordinate to the Kingdom of Hungary.[2]

Life[edit]

After the death of despot Jovan Branković (1502), Vladislaus II of Hungary made Ivaniš Berislavić the interim despot of Serbia.[2] With no male successor to the Branković dynasty, the position was given to the Berislavić family which had already been intertwined with the Branković dynasty with the marriage of Ivan's cousin Franjo Berislavić and Barbara Frankopan, who had been the widow of Vuk Branković II.[2] In addition, their estates shared borders,[3] and despot Đorđe Branković as well as Jovan had been supporters of Mathias Corvinus just like the Berislavićs.[2]

Nevertheless, the decision was apparently not welcomed in Serbia, where the local chroniclers would not mention Ivaniš Berislavić by name, likely because they had expected the privilege to pass to the Serbian House of Jakšić, who were also in service of the Hungarian king.[2]

The official act of making Ivaniš the despot was confirmed by January 1504 in Buda, when his marriage with Jovan's widow Jelena (née Jakšić) was arranged, and he received the title of despot of Serbia.[2] The marriage itself was postponed until May 1504 because of Jelena's illness.[2]

Ivaniš was put as protector of the Orthodox Church in Hungary, and in the charters he signed as "In God's Grace, the Despot of Serbia".

The defence of the southern border of the Kingdom of Hungary was handled by Berislavić as despot, with support of Stevan, Marko and Petar Jakšić, Stjepan Bradač, and the armed forces of Belgrade and Šabac.[2][3]

His son, Stefan, had the title of "Serbian Despot" until his defeat in battle against the Ottomans in 1535.

Berislavić received the former appanage of Jovan, which the Hungarians had confiscated with his death. His residence was at Kupinik, in Srem.

Berislavić was also named the "Ban of Jajce" in 1511, replacing Baltazar Alapić.[2][4]

He took an oath to secure the southern borders of Hungary and being loyal to his people. He also had a seat at Brod on the Sava, from where he viewed his cities in Srem and Slavonia, including Jajce Banovina.

Because his duties involved a significant effort as well as financial cost, he repeatedly asked the Hungarian King to remove him from service as Ban of Jajce in 1513, and the King complied on May 25.[2] This was the last mention of him alive, and he is assumed to have died in 1514, because his wife despot Jelena is mentioned as the Lord of the Despot's military forces.[2][4]


Regnal titles
Vacant
Title last held by
Jovan Branković
Despot of the Kingdom of Serbia
1504–1514
Succeeded by
Stefan Berislavić

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vladimir Ćorović (13 January 2014). Istorija srpskog naroda. eBook Portal. pp. 432–. GGKEY:XPENWQLDTZF. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Karbić, Marija (December 2006). "Hrvatsko plemstvo u borbi protiv Osmanlija. Primjer obitelji Berislavića Grabarskih iz Slavonije" (PDF). Historical Contributions (in Croatian) (Zagreb: Croatian Institute of History) 31 (31): 71–85. ISSN 0351-9767. 
  3. ^ a b Ivić 1914, p. 32
  4. ^ a b Ivić 1914, p. 35

Sources[edit]

  • Ivić, Aleksa (1914). Istorija Srba u Ugarskoj od pada Smedereva do seobe pod Čarnojevićem (1495-1690). Privrednikova knijižara. 
  • Božanić, S. 2007, "Srem in the period between 1502 and 1526", Spomenica Istorijskog arhiva Srem, no. 6, pp. 72–88.
  • Aleksa Ivić: Istorija Srba u Vojvodini. Novi Sad 1929.
  • Mitrović, K. 2008, "Povelja despotice Jelene Jakšić manastiru Hilandaru", Stari srpski arhiv, no. 7, pp. 195–203.
  • Rastko e-library, Istorija Srba
  • Crkva Sretenjska