J. P. Cormier

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J. P. Cormier
JPCormier2005.jpg
J.P. Cormier and Hilda Chiasson-Cormier performing in Edmonton in 2005
Background information
Birth name John Paul Cormier
Born January 23, 1969
London, Ontario
Genres Bluegrass. Folk music, Celtic
Occupations Musician, Singer-songwriter
Years active 1981–present
Labels Flash Entertainment, Fontana North
Website http://www.jp-cormier.com/

J.P. (John Paul) Cormier is a Canadian bluegrass/Folk/Celtic singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist. He was born in London, Ontario in 1969 and began playing guitar around age five. As a child he displayed an unusual ability to play a variety of instruments by ear and won a guitar contest at age nine.

Mr. Cormier has stated that he learned to play guitar by listening to such noted country / bluegrass musicians as Chet Atkins and Doc Watson. Other instruments J.P. has played on his albums include fiddle, twelve string guitar, upright bass, banjo, mandolin, drums, percussion, synthesizer, Cello, Tenor Banjo and piano.

By age 16 Cormier had recorded his first album (a collection of bluegrass instrumentals) and he began working the U.S. festival circuit. This led him to move to the United States and to begin working as a session musician. He continued to perform live on the festival circuit and at the Grand Ole Opry with country artists Waylon Jennings, Marty Stuart, Earl Scruggs, Bill Monroe and others.

In 1989 he attended the Northeast Mississippi Junior College (now called Northeast Mississippi Community College) in Booneville Mississippi where he majored in Music Education. At the time, Northeast Mississippi Junior College was one of only three colleges in North America that offered a specialty in Bluegrass instruments. During his stay at Northeast he began playing the dobro and piano. It was also during this time he first had the idea for the song "Northwind".

Discography[edit]

  • Return to the Cape (1995)
  • Another Morning (1997)
  • Heart & Soul (1999)
  • Now That the Work Is Done (2001)
  • Primary Color (2002)
  • Velvet Arm Golden Hand (2002)
  • X8… a mandolin collection (2004)
  • The Long River: A Personal Tribute to Gordon Lightfoot (2005)
  • Primary Color: The Owner's Manual (2005)
  • Looking Back - Volume 1: The Instrumentals (2005)
  • Looking Back - Volume 2: The Songs (2005)
  • "Take Five - A Banjo Collection" (2006)
  • "The Messenger - J.P. Cormier Sings" (2008)
  • "Noel - A J.P. Cormier Christmas" (2008)

Albums That Are No Longer Available

  • "Out Of The Blue" (Out Of Print)
  • "The Gift" (Out Of Print)
  • "Lord Of The Dance" (Out Of Print)
  • "When January Comes" (Out Of Print)
  • The Fiddle Album (1991) CBC UG 1003

Awards[edit]

He has won or been nominated for the following awards:

  • Maritime Fiddling Festival- Best Reel - 1989
  • East Coast Music Award (ECMA) Instrumental Album of the Year - 1991
  • Maritime Fiddling Festival - Best Reel - 1995
  • East Coast Music Award(ECMA) Roots/Traditional Artist of the Year - 1998
  • Nominated for a Juno Award in the Roots/Trad recording of the year category for "Another Morning" 1998
  • East Coast Music Award (ECMA) Instrumental Album of the Year - 2000
  • East Coast Music Award (ECMA) Instrumental Artist of the Year - 2003
  • Music Industry Association Nova Scotia (MIANS) Folk/Roots Artist of the Year - 2005
  • Music Industry Association Nova Scotia (MIANS) Musician of the Year - 2005
  • Canadian Folk Music Awards - Instrumental Album Of The Year - 2005
  • East Coast Music Award (ECMA) Folk Recording of the Year - 2006 (The Long River)[1]

In addition, he has won several East Coast Music Awards and the Music Industry Association of Nova Scotia (MIANS) Award in various years.

In 2005 the Bravo! network aired J.P. Cormier - The Man and His Music, a one hour documentary examining the life and music of J.P. Cormier. J.P. was also featured on Bravo's half hour program "Men Of Music".

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Canyon is the toast of the coast", The Toronto Star, 19 February 2007t

External links[edit]