J. P. Manoux

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J.P. Manoux
Born Jean-Paul Christophe Manoux
(1969-06-08) June 8, 1969 (age 45)
Fresno, California, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1994-present

Jean-Paul Christophe "J. P." Manoux (born June 8, 1969) is an American actor.

Life and career[edit]

Manoux was born in Fresno, California,[1][2] and grew up in Santa Barbara, California, the eldest of seven children. He is perhaps best known for his work in multiple Disney series: as S.T.A.N. the android in Disney XD's Aaron Stone (February 2009 - July 2010), as both Curtis the Caveman and Vice Principal Hackett in Disney Channel's Phil of the Future, and as the voice of Kuzco in The Emperor's New School.

Manoux was also a contestant on Jeopardy!, Family Feud and Wheel of Fortune.[3]

One of Manoux's early on-camera jobs was as a regular performer on the short-lived variety series The Wayne Brady Show.[4] He went on from there to work extensively in film, television, and commercials, including campaigns for Got Milk? and Fruit of the Loom. He played recurring surgical resident Dustin Crenshaw in two of the later seasons of ER. Other memorable guest star roles in television shows include How I Met Your Mother, Angel, Smallville, Charmed, Scrubs, and Community.

He has played a mime on more than one occasion, briefly on ER (1996), years before he became a recurring character there, and in the film EuroTrip (2004). He has also made small appearances in two Michael Bay films: Transformers, where he was a guy being interviewed on television, and in The Island, where he portrayed a mentally underdeveloped clone.

Manoux has directed episodes of Aaron Stone, Phil of the Future, and the Canadian children's program Mudpit.

He has authored and read two pieces for NPR's All Things Considered. Back in 2000, he provided commentary on the Screen Actors Guild strike as a striking actor and refused to do scab work.[5]

A permanent resident of Canada, he splits his time between Los Angeles and Toronto, where is currently working on the CTV sitcom Spun Out.

Films[edit]

Manoux at the 2012 Fan Expo Canada

Television series[edit]

Video games[edit]

  • The Emperor's New Groove (Video Game) - Kuzco
  • Kronk's New Groove (2005) - Kuzco (DVD games)
  • Kingdom Hearts II (2006) - Additional Voices
  • Disney Infinity (2013) - Randy

Writing[edit]

Manoux and George Brant wrote the stage musical Tights on a Wire (1997).[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.filmreference.com/film/11/J-P-Manoux.html
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ "Interview : J.P Manoux". Moviehole. 2004-04-22. Retrieved 2012-06-10. 
  4. ^ Cox, Ted (August 7, 2001). "Wayne Brady Revives the Classic Variety Show: Can He Pull It Off?". Daily Herald. Arlington Heights, IL. Retrieved September 28, 2012. (subscription required (help)). 
  5. ^ LINDA WERTHEIMER. "Commentary: Screen Actors Guild strike." NPR All Things Considered. National Public Radio. 2000. Retrieved September 28, 2012 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P1-30369545.html Subscription required.
  6. ^ Kathy Blumenstock - Washington Post Staff Writer. "In a High School Minute; Students Hopscotch Across Time to Fix the Small Stuff." The Washington Post. Washingtonpost Newsweek Interactive. 2008. Retrieved September 28, 2012 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P2-15136428.html Subscription required
  7. ^ "Knocked Up." VideoHound's Golden Movie Retriever. Gale. 2008. Retrieved September 28, 2012 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G2-2505914059.html Subscription required
  8. ^ McNary, Dave. "'Party' on at Lampoon.(National Lampoon Inc.)(Brief article)." Daily Variety. Reed Business Information, Inc. (US). 2007. Retrieved September 28, 2012 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-167894535.html Subscription required
  9. ^ Leydon, Joe. "Starship Troopers 2: Hero of the Federation(motion picture).(Movie Review)." Daily Variety. Reed Business Information, Inc. (US). 2004. Retrieved September 28, 2012 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-119113639.html Subscription required
  10. ^ Wesley Morris, Globe Staff. "`EUROTRIP' HAPPILY TRAVELS IN TEEN-SEX TERRITORY." The Boston Globe (Boston, MA). The New York Times Company. 2004. Retrieved September 28, 2012 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P2-7826377.html Subscription required
  11. ^ "Television highlights for the week of June 17–24.(Knight Ridder Newspapers)." Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service. McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. 2001. Retrieved September 28, 2012 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-75362170.html Subscription required
  12. ^ "Action meets magic." New Straits Times. Financial Times Ltd. 2010. Retrieved September 28, 2012 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P1-180220228.html Subscription required
  13. ^ "When bosses attack; A look at the worst - and a few of the best - taskmasters on TV.(Arts and Lifestyle)." The Boston Herald. Herald Media, LLC. 2006. Retrieved September 28, 2012 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-153492784.html Subscription required
  14. ^ NOAH ADAMS. "Commentary: Network debut." NPR All Things Considered. National Public Radio. 2001. Retrieved September 28, 2012 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P1-42227267.html Subscription required
  15. ^ "`The African Company' blends comedy, anger and history." Chicago Sun-Times. Sun-Times News Group. 1997. Retrieved September 28, 2012 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P2-4392350.html Subscription required

External links[edit]