Jack Coxford

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Jack Coxford
Personal information
Full name John Coxford
Date of birth (1901-07-25)25 July 1901
Place of birth North Seaton, Ashington, England
Date of death 1978 (aged 76–77)
Place of death Bury St Edmunds, England
Playing position Centre half
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
North Seaton Colliery ? (?)
Stakeford United ? (?)
1924–1927 Sunderland 11 (0)
1927–1930 Birmingham 16 (0)
1930–1934 Bournemouth & Boscombe Athletic 134 (3)
1934 Poole Town 2 (0)
1934–193x Northfleet United ? (?)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

John "Jack" Coxford (25 July 1901 – 1978) was an English professional footballer who played in the Football League for Small Heath.[1] He played as a centre half.

Coxford was born in Seaton Hirst, Ashington, Northumberland. He played for North Seaton Colliery and Stakeford United before joining Sunderland in 1924.[2] He made his debut in the First Division on 18 April 1925, in a 1–1 draw at Blackburn Rovers, but never established himself as a first-team player, and in April 1927, after only 11 games for Sunderland, Coxford joined fellow First Division club Birmingham.[2][3] He was signed as cover for George Morrall, but the developing Tom Fillingham pushed Coxford down the pecking order, and after three years with the club in which he played only 16 games, he left for Bournemouth & Boscombe Athletic of the Third Division South. At Bournemouth, Coxford had four seasons of regular first-team football. Towards the end of the 1933–34 season, he played two games for nearby Poole Town[2] before moving on to Northfleet United as player-coach.[4]

Northfleet United acted as a nursery club for Tottenham Hotspur. Wales and Tottenham player Ron Burgess described in his autobiography how

We were a young side at Northfleet, for the average age of the lads, with the exception of our skipper and centre-half, Jack Coxford, could not have been more than 19 years. Jack was the 'old head' amongst that bunch of sprightly youth, and what he didn't know about the game wasn't worth knowing! He did his best to impart some of his knowledge and experience to us by his grand example and influence.[4]

Coxford went on to join the training staff at Tottenham, working under Cecil Poynton, with particular responsibility for the reserve team.[5]

Coxford died in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, in 1978 aged about 77.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Joyce, Michael (2004). Football League Players' Records 1888 to 1939. Nottingham: SoccerData (Tony Brown). p. 63. ISBN 978-1-899468-67-6. 
  2. ^ a b c d Matthews, Tony (1995). Birmingham City: A Complete Record. Derby: Breedon Books. p. 80. ISBN 978-1-85983-010-9. 
  3. ^ "John Coxford". TheStatCat. Retrieved 31 March 2009. 
  4. ^ a b Burgess, Ron (1952). Football: My Life. London: Souvenir Press. pp. 27–29. , quoted in "Soccer's kindergarten: Kent's nursery clubs of the 1930s" (PDF). Soccer History (6). Retrieved 31 March 2009. 
  5. ^ "A group of seven medals, comprising: two silver-gil". LiveAuctioneers.com. Retrieved 31 March 2009.