Jack Gerard

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Jack Gerard is the CEO of the American Petroleum Institute in Washington, DC.[1]

Early Life and Education[edit]

Gerard grew up in Terreton, Idaho. He attended the University of Idaho for a year before serving a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in Australia. He then returned to the University of Idaho. He later transferred to George Washington University while also working on the staff of Representative George Hansen. He earned a bachelors degree in political science and a Juris Doctorate from George Washington University. Gerard then spent about five years on the staff of Senator James A. McClure.

Career[edit]

Gerard later, with former Senator McClure, cofounded the lobbying firm of McClure, Gerard & Neuenschwander. When that firm was sold, he became president and CEO of the National Mining Association.

Prior to his current position Gerard served as president and CEO of the American Chemistry Council.

Gerard was formerly president of the McLean, Virginia Stake of the LDS Church and chairman of the National Capital Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America. He is currently an Area Seventy in the North America Northeast Area and member of the Sixth Quorum of the Seventy, recently serving alongside J. W. "Bill" Marriott, Jr., Chairman and CEO of Marriott International.[2]

Gerard sits on the Council on American Politics, which brings leaders from the forefront of today's political and communications arena together to address issues facing the growth and enrichment of GW’s Graduate School of Political Management.[3]

In August 2012, Politico reported that Gerard "gets mentioned as a possible chief of staff or Energy secretary" in a potential Romney administration.[4]

In the Huffington Post, there was the comment:"I could see Romney calling on Gerard in a role such as White House chief of staff and in the transition," said one veteran energy lobbyist who knows Gerard. But the lobbyist added that placing Gerard "in a Cabinet position such as Energy or Interior seems a little far-fetched given his years of work representing Big Oil." A top Republican lobbyist also cited Gerard's long work for the industry as an obstacle to confirmation, but said that his power within the administration would nevertheless be immense.[5]

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