Jack Rabbit (Kennywood)

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Jack Rabbit
Kennywood Jack Rabbit DSCN2775.JPG
Kennywood
Coordinates 40°23′12″N 79°51′46″W / 40.38667°N 79.86278°W / 40.38667; -79.86278Coordinates: 40°23′12″N 79°51′46″W / 40.38667°N 79.86278°W / 40.38667; -79.86278
Status Operating
Opening date 1920[1]
Cost $50,000
General statistics
Type Wood
Manufacturer Harry C. Baker
Designer John A. Miller
Model Out and Back roller coaster
Track layout Terrain
Lift/launch system Chain lift
Height 40 ft (12 m)
Drop 70 ft (21 m)
Length 2,132 ft (650 m)
Speed 45 mph (72 km/h)
Inversions 0
Duration 1:36
Max vertical angle 45°
G-force 4.99
Height restriction 36 in (91 cm)
Trains 3 trains with 3 cars. Riders are arranged 2 across in 3 rows for a total of 18 riders per train.
Jack Rabbit at RCDB
Pictures of Jack Rabbit at RCDB

Jack Rabbit is a wooden roller coaster located at Kennywood Park in West Mifflin, Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh, USA.

Designed and built by John A. Miller and Harry C. Baker[2] in 1920, it is one of the oldest still-running roller coasters in the world. The ride's three trains were manufactured by Edward Vettel, Sr. in 1951 and contain three cars of six seats each. The aging cars are considered a part of the ride's nostalgic experience but also lead to some young children being disallowed to enter the ride (36" is the minimum), due to the use of a small lapbar to hold in riders. A popular early feature of the ride was a tunnel which covered the turnaround section after the first drop, but this was removed in 1947 when the new cars were ordered. In 1991, the tunnel was restored, at a slightly shorter length.

The Jack Rabbit was built shortly after Miller patented a new track design in 1920 (which all wooden coasters built since have used). This design involved the use of wheels both under and over the track, which allowed Miller to create the then enormous 70-foot (21 m) drop that is the attraction's largest. It is most well known for its double dip following the lift hill. The double dip produces strong airtime that makes the rider feel that they will be thrown from the seat, and a feeling that the train leaves the track (it rises up but the upstop wheels keep it firmly on the rails).

According to Rick Sebak, producer of Pittsburgh history programs for WQED, the attraction was designed so that each train's last seat would provide the strongest airtime, and therefore the most desired ride.

Awards[edit]

It is an ACE Coaster Classic.[3][clarification needed]

Jack Rabbit was designated as an "ACE Roller Coaster Landmark" by American Coaster Enthusiasts in June, 2010.[4]

Golden Ticket Awards: Top wood Roller Coasters
Year 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Ranking 20[5] 22[6] [7] 36 (tied)[8] 37[9] 42[10] 34[11] 28[12] 37[13] 33[14] 34[15] 39[16] 20[17] 23[18] 16[19] 18[20]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hahner, David (2004). Images of America: Kennywood. Portsmouth, NH: Arcadia Publishing. p. 45. ISBN 0-7385-3563-X. 
  2. ^ Miller and Baker Inc. 1923 Catalogue (reprint). Natrona Heights, PA: Amusement Park Journal. 1923. 
  3. ^ ACE Coaster Classic Awards
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ "Top 25 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 6B. August 1998. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Top 25 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 6B. August 1999. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Top 25 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. August 2000. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Top 25 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 6B. August 2001. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Top 25 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 6B. September 2002. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 10–11B. September 2003. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 14–15B. September 2004. Archived from the original on April 3, 2007. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 22–23B. September 2005. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 30–31B. September 2006. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 11 (6.2): 42–43. September 2007. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 12 (6.2): 42–43. September 2008. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 13 (6.2): 38–39. September 2009. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 14 (6.2): 38–39. September 2010. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  18. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 15 (6.2): 46–47. September 2011. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 16 (6.2): 46–47. September 2012. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  20. ^ "2013 Top 50 wood Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 17 (6.2): 40–41. September 2013. Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013.