Jack Rhodes

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Andrew Jackson (Jack) Rhodes (1908–1968) was an American country music producer and songwriter, with songwriting credits on over 100 released records.[1] Several of his songs became hit records, including "A Satisfied Mind", "Silver Threads and Golden Needles", "Conscience I'm Guilty", "The Waltz of the Angels", "Beautiful Lies", and "Till the Last Leaf Shall Fall". Inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1972[2] (posthumously), he is most recently celebrated as one of the founding fathers of Rockabilly, imparting a country/rock infusion. He was inducted into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame in 2009, and memorabilia are currently on exhibit at the Mineola Historical Museum in Mineola, Texas.

Rhodes is recognised for the groundbreaking rockabilly songs "Rockin Bones", "Action Packed", and "Woman Love". Revered as an influential mentor for many an upstart artist in the mid to late 1950s, he and his fellow collaborators wrote many songs for Gene Vincent while on the Capitol label.

BMI awarded him for over a million radio broadcasts for "Silver Threads and Golden Needles", and has received numerous gold records for various releases. One of these was a US country music #1 hit with "A Satisfied Mind" by Porter Wagoner.

Biography[edit]

Jack Rhodes was born in 1908 in Van Zandt County, Texas. Little is known about his early childhood except that he never completed school. It has been rumored that he only made it through the third grade. Like many school-age children during that period, he quit to help support his family.

During World War II, he worked in the Houston, Texas shipyards. Rhodes started his career as a songwriter after breaking his back in a work-related accident. While recovering, he began writing songs, trying to stave off the boredom of being bedridden.

Rhodes owned a café in Grand Saline, Texas, and later opened The Trail 80 Motor Courts, a gas station and restaurant in Mineola, Texas.

Leon Payne (Rhodes' step-brother) wrote "I Love You Because", which has been covered by — among others — Elvis Presley (Elvis Presley LP, 1956), Al Martino (Billboard Hot 100 #3, 1963), Jim Reeves (UK Singles Chart #5, 1964), Johnny Cash, Matt Monro and Slim Whitman.

Rhodes' first wife's name was Lucille, although the date of their marriage is unknown. They had three sons, Bobby, Billy Jack, and Don, and a daughter, Wanda. Bobby was killed while crossing traffic as a young boy.

Rhodes divorced Lucille in the mid to early 1950s, and in 1955 married Loretta Williams. They had one son, Buddy, in 1956.

In October 1968 Rhodes died of a heart attack.

Career[edit]

Throughout his early years, Jack Rhodes formed several groups with his step-brother Leon Payne, The Lone Star Buddies being among the most famous. The group released several singles and were regulars at The Louisiana Hayride, as well as performing throughout East Texas and Louisiana. He also formed The Jack Rhodes Ramblers.

Rhodes founded his own record label, "National Sounds", under his company, All-Roads Music. However, pressings from this label are rare and much sought after by collectors. Most releases were Rockabilly songs, although some standard country songs were also made.

"The Lone Star Buddies"

"Lipstick Trail"

"Empty Arms"

"Mama Loves Papa, and Papa Loves the Women"

Covers and Movie Soundtracks[edit]

Porter Wagoner"Coal Miner's Daughter" and "The People vs. Larry Flynt"

Glen Campbell

Jeff Buckley

Johnny Cash"Kill Bill Vol. 2"

Red Foley

Joan Baez

Bob Dylan

The Byrds"Woman Love"

Gene Vincent"The Singing Detective"

Hazel Dickens"By The Sweat Of My Brow"

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jack Rhodes Discography at Discogs". Discogs. Retrieved 2012-01-26. 
  2. ^ "Nashville Songwriters Foundation". Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2012-01-26. 

External links[edit]