Jacob T. Schwartz

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Jacob T. Schwartz
Born (1930-01-09)January 9, 1930
The Bronx, New York
Died March 2, 2009(2009-03-02) (aged 79)
Manhattan, New York
Nationality American
Fields Applied mathematics
Computer sciences
Institutions Yale University
New York University
Alma mater Yale University
City College of New York
Doctoral advisor Nelson Dunford
Doctoral students Jerry Hobbs
Ken Kennedy
Robert Kupperman
Stanley Osher
Gian-Carlo Rota
Shmuel Winograd
Known for Dunford-Schwartz theorem
Notable awards Leroy P. Steele Prize (1981)

Jacob Theodore "Jack" Schwartz (January 9, 1930 – March 2, 2009)[1] was an American mathematician, computer scientist, and professor of computer science at the New York University Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. He was the designer of the SETL programming language and the NYU Ultracomputer. He founded the New York University Department of Computer Science, chairing it from 1964 to 1980.[1]

He received his B.S. (1949) from the City College of New York and his M.A. (1949) and Ph.D. (1951) from Yale University. He was elected to the National Academy of Science in 1976, and to the National Academy of Engineering in 2000.

His research interests included: the theory of linear operators, von Neumann algebras, quantum field theory, time-sharing, parallel computing, programming language design and implementation, robotics, set-theoretic approaches in computational logic, proof and program verification systems; multimedia authoring tools; experimental studies of visual perception; multimedia and other high-level software techniques for analysis and visualization of bioinformatic data.

He authored 18 books and more than 100 papers and technical reports.

He is also the inventor of the Artspeak programming language that historically ran on mainframes and produced graphical output using a single-color graphical plotter.[2]

He served as Chairman of the Computer Science Department (which he founded) at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, from 1969 to 1977. He also served as Chairman of the Computer Science Board of the National Research Council and was the former Chairman of the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for Information, Robotics and Intelligent Systems. From 1986 to 1989, he was the Director of DARPA's Information Science and Technology Office (DARPA/ISTO) in Arlington, Virginia.

Jacob T Schwartz has two daughters; Abby Schwartz, living in New York City, and Rachel Fainman (Stage name Rachel Kane), living in Winnipeg, Canada. Jack also has two grandchildren: Adrienne Fainman and Adam Fainman.

Publications[edit]

  • Nelson Dunford, Jacob T. Schwartz Linear Operators, Part I General Theory ISBN 0-471-60848-3,[3] Part II Spectral Theory, Self Adjoint Operators in Hilbert Space ISBN 0-471-60847-5,[4] Part III Spectral Operators ISBN 0-471-60846-7
  • J. Schwartz (1956). "Riemann's method in the theory of special functions". Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 62 (6): 531–540. doi:10.1090/s0002-9904-1956-10065-7. MR 0081360. 
  • Jacob T. Schwartz, Introduction to Matrices and Vectors, McGraw-Hill (1961)
  • Jacob T. Schwartz, Lectures on the Mathematical Method in Analytical Economics, Gordon and Breach (1961)
  • Jacob T. Schwartz, Relativity In Illustrations, New York University Press (1962)
  • Jacob T. Schwartz, Theory of money (Mathematics and its applications), Gordon and Breach (1965)
  • Jacob T. Schwartz, W-* algebras (Notes on mathematics and its applications), Gordon and Breach (1967), ISBN 978-0-17-178707-8
  • Jacob T. Schwartz (ed.), Mathematical Aspects of Computer Science, American Mathematical Society (1967)
  • Jacob T. Schwartz, Nonlinear Functional Analysis, Gordon and Breach (1968)
  • Jacob T. Schwartz, Differential Geometry and Topology, Gordon and Breach (1969)
  • J. T. Schwartz (1974). "Semantic and syntactic issues in programming". Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 80 (2): 185–206. doi:10.1090/s0002-9904-1974-13431-2. MR 0339536. 
  • Jacob T. Schwartz, Robert B. K. Dewar, Programming With Sets: An Introduction to Setl, Springer (November 1986), ISBN 978-0-387-96399-0
  • Jacob T. Schwartz, The Limits of Artificial Intelligence, found in the Encyclopedia of Artificial Intelligence, 2 vols., John Wiley and Songs, 1987
  • Jacob T. Schwartz, Mark Kac, and Gian-Carlo Rota, Discrete Thoughts: Essays on Mathematics, Science, and Philosophy, Birkhäuser Boston; 2nd edition (January 11, 2008), ISBN 978-0-8176-4774-2

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Recipient Wilbur Cross Medal, Yale University
  • Townsend Harris Medal, City University of New York
  • Mayor's Medal for Contributions to Science and Technology, New York City, 1986
  • Leroy P. Steele Prize, American Mathematical Society, August 1981 (shared with N. Dunford)
  • Sloan Fellow, 1961–1962
  • Distinguished Lecturer at the following Universities: University of California, Santa Barbara; Harvard University; MIT; Cornell University; University of Washington; University of Southern California; Trinity College, Dublin

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]