Jackson, Robertson & Adams

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At center, the tower of the Providence County Courthouse, Providence (1924)
Post Office Annex, Providence (1939)

Jackson, Robertson & Adams was an architectural firm out of Providence, Rhode Island. Established in 1912, it was originally made up of architects F. Ellis Jackson (1879-1950), Wayland T. Robertson (1873-1935), and J. Howard Adams (1876-1924).[1]

Prior to founding this firm, Jackson worked with Providence architect Howard K. Hilton. He was promoted to parter in 1902, the name being Hilton & Jackson. Upon Hilton's death in 1909, Jackson continued on alone under the Hilton & Jackson name.[2] In 1911, Jackson formed the firm of Jackson & Robertson with Wayland T. Robertson. The next year, they added J. Howard Adams to make Jackson, Robertson & Adams. Both Robertson and Adams had had private practice prior to becoming members of the firm.

The firm designed numerous Colonial Revival buildings around the state, and rank with Rhode Island's best architecture. Beginning in the 1930s, Jackson, Robertson & Adams became one of the few architects in the state to work in the Art Deco style.[3] While they had a specialty in private residences, they also designed notable civic and commercial buildings.

The Jackson, Robertson & Adams name was retained until 1956, when the then two partners, George Fraser and Raymond J. Henthorne, renamed it Fraser & Henthorne.[4] This firm was dissolved in 1961.[5]

Works of Jackson, Robertson & Adams[edit]

In Providence, Rhode Island:

  • Alice W. Adams House, 57 Barnes St., Providence, RI (1912)[6]
  • Charles O. Read House, 123 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, RI (1914)[7]
  • Franklin Street Fire Station, 33 Franklin St., Providence, RI (1914) - Demolished.[8]
  • John P. Farnsworth House, 104 Prospect St., Providence, RI (1914)[9]
  • Remodeling, Providence City Hall, 25 Dorrance St., Providence, RI (1914)[10]
  • Benjamin P. Moulton House, 50 Channing Ave., Providence, RI (1915)[11]
  • Central Baptist Church, 372 Wayland Ave., Providence, RI (1915) - Now the Community Church of Providence.[12]
  • Charles Grossman House, 72 Barnes St., Providence, RI (1915)[13]
  • George H. Cahoone House, 360 Olney St., Providence, RI (1915)[14]
  • Gloria Dei Evangelical Lutheran Church, 15 Hayes St., Providence, RI (1916) - Replaced by a new church by Martin Hedmark in 1925.[15][16]
  • J. Howard Adams House, 64 E. Orchard Ave., Providence, RI (1916) - Home of the architect.[17]
  • James W. Thornley House, 2 Freeman Pkwy., Providence, RI (1916)[18]
  • John S. Holbrook House, 106 Prospect St., Providence, RI (1916)[19]
  • Murray S. Danforth Medical Office, 402 Angell St., Providence, RI (1916)[20]
  • Richard A. Hurley House, 103 Alumni Ave., Providence, RI (1916)[21]
  • James P. Murphy House, 57 Boylston Ave., Providence, RI (1917)[22]
  • Mary G. Chapin House, 170 Everett Ave., Providence, RI (1917)[23]
  • Carrie M. Sutcliffe House, 120 Laurel Ave., Providence, RI (1918)[24]
  • General Fire Extinguisher Co. Office Building, 260 W. Exchange St., Providence, RI (1919)[25]
  • Victory Arch, [[Kennedy Plaza}Kennedy Plz.]], Providence, RI (1919) - A temporary structure built to celebrate the end of World War I.[26]
  • Shubael B. Howes House, 450 Wayland Ave., Providence, RI (1920) - Architect Wayland T. Robertson was the first occupant.[27]
  • Remodeling of Joseph Brown House for Counting House Corporation, 50 S. Main St., Providence, RI (1920) - Includes an extensive rear addition visible from Hopkins Street.[28]
  • 556 Westminster Street, 556 Westminster St., Providence, RI (1922) - An office building at Cathedral Square, now demolished.[29]
  • David P. Moulton House, 75 E. Orchard Ave., Providence, RI (1922)[30]
  • Remodeling of the Nightingale-Brown House for John Nicholas Brown II, 357 Benefit St., Providence, RI (1922)[31]
  • Benjamin Brier House, 15 Upton Ave., Providence, RI (1924)[32]
  • Providence County Courthouse, 250 Benefit St., Providence, RI (1924)[33]
  • Frederick W. Tillinghast House, 39 E. Orchard Ave., Providence, RI (1925)[34]
  • Jeanette B. Huntoon House, 63 Manning St., Providence, RI (1925)[35]
  • Lucy P. Kelley House, 25 Orchard Ave., Providence, RI (1925)[36]
  • Morris Plan Bank Building, 25 Canal St., Providence, RI (1926)[37]
  • Nurses' Home, Rhode Island Homeopathic Hospital, 825 Chalkstone Ave., Providence, RI (1927)[38]
  • Phenix National Bank Building, 89 Westminster St., Providence, RI (1927) - Among the buildings demolished for 50 Kennedy Plaza.[39]
  • Rhode Island State Office Building, 133 Smith St., Providence, RI (1927)[40]
  • Rhode Island Hospital Trust Co. Branch, 1 Olneyville Sq., Providence, RI (1931)[41]
  • Charles M. Smith III House, 295 Laurel Ave., Providence, RI (1933)[42]
  • College Building, 2 College St., Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI (1936)[43]
  • St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church, 445 Elmwood Ave., Providence, RI (1938)[44]
  • U. S. Post Office Annex, 1 Exchange Ter., Providence, RI (1939)[45]
  • Henry Bowen Anthony Fountain, Lippitt Memorial Park, 1059 Hope St., Providence, RI (1940)[46]
  • Industrial Trust Co. Branch, 582 Elmwood Ave., Providence, RI (1947)[47]
  • Brook Street Fire Station, 223 Brook St., Providence, RI (1950)[48]
  • North Main Street Fire Station, 151 N. Main St., Providence, RI (1952)[49]

In other parts of Rhode Island:

  • Hope Co. Houses, 1-3, 2-4 Brown St., 7-9, 11-13 Goddard St., Hope, RI (1916)[50]
  • Hope Co. Overseers' House, 66-68 Main St., Hope, RI (1917)[51]
  • Lonsdale Co. Houses, 12-14, 16-18, 20-22, 24-26 Blackstone St., Lonsdale, RI (1917)[52][53]
  • Stillwater Co. Houses, 23, 33 Burrill Rd., 11, 20, 36, 45, 50, 66, 80, 90 N. Hill Rd., 4, 22, 36, 50 Park Ave., 63, 75, 95, 107, 125, 145, 155 & 171 Steere Rd., Harrisville, RI (1918)[54]
  • Rhode Island Malleable Iron Works, 697 Jefferson Blvd., Hillsgrove, RI (1918) - All but the administration building has been demolished.[55]
  • Charles Brown House, 64 Ocean Ave., Pawtuxet, RI (1919)[56]
  • Industrial Trust Co. Branch, 39 Warren Ave., East Providence, RI (1920)[57]
  • Lonsdale Co. Houses, 152-154, 156-158 & 164-166 Lonsdale Main St., Lonsdale, RI (1920)[58]
  • Henry S. Newcombe House, 2950 Boston Neck Rd., Saunderstown, RI (1921)[59]
  • Industrial Trust Co. Branch, 1 Fountain Sq., Pascoag, RI (1922)[60]
  • Davisville Free Library, 481 Davisville Rd., Davisville, RI (1923)[61]
  • Pascoag Free Public Library, 57 Church St., Pascoag, RI (1923)[62]
  • Westerly Power & Light Co. Building, 53-55 High St., Westerly, RI (1926) - Westerly Power & Light became South County Public Service in 1929 after a merger.[63]
  • St. Mary's Home for Children, 420 Fruit Hill Ave., Fruit Hill, RI (1927)[64]
  • Main Gate, Yawgoog Scout Reservation, 61 Camp Yawgoog Rd., Rockville, RI (1931)[65]
  • Rhode Island State Police Barracks, 54 Nooseneck Hill Rd., Wyoming, RI (1931)[66]
  • Rhode Island State Police Barracks, 1575 Old Louisquisset Pk., Lincoln, RI (1931)[67]
  • Administration Building, 572 Airport Rd., T. F. Green Airport, Hillsgrove, RI (1932)[68]
  • Assembly Theatre, 26 East Ave., Harrisville, RI (1933)[69]
  • Bucklin Memorial Building, Yawgoog Scout Reservation, 61 Camp Yawgoog Rd., Rockville, RI (1933)[70]
  • Burrillville Town Building, 105 Harrisville Main St., Harrisville, RI (1933)[71]
  • Remodeling, First Universalist Church, 134 Harrisville Main St., Harrisville, RI (1933)[72]
  • Rhode Island State Police Barracks, 7875 Post Rd., Wickford, RI (1933)[73]
  • Ninth District Courthouse, 105 Harrisville Main St., Harrisville, RI (1934) - Now the Town Hall Annex.[74]
  • Rhode Island State Police Barracks, 838 E. Main Rd., Portsmouth, RI (1935)[75]
  • Burrillville High School, 75 Callahan School St., Harrisville, RI (1936) - Now the William L. Callahan School.[76]
  • Green Hall, 35 Campus Ave., University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (1936)[77]
  • Manager's House, Agawam Hunt Club, 15 Roger Williams Ave., Phillipsdale, RI (1936)[78]
  • Jesse M. Smith Memorial Library, 144 Harrisville Main St., Harrisville, RI (1937) - Now houses town offices.[79]
  • Passenger Terminal & Hangar No. 1, 660 Airport Rd., T. F. Green Airport, Hillsgrove, RI (1937) - Demolished in 2013.[80]
  • Jesse H. Metcalf Lodge, Yawgoog Scout Reservation, 61 Camp Yawgoog Rd., Rockville, RI (1939)[81]
  • Hangar No. 2, 554 Airport Rd., T. F. Green Airport, Hillsgrove, RI (1940)[82]
  • Industrial Trust Co. Branch, 3033 Post Rd., Apponaug, RI (1948)[83]
  • U. S. Post Office, 131 Harrisville Main St., Harrisville, RI (1952) - Built by and donated to the federal government by Austin L. Levy.[84]
  • Pontiac Free Library, 101 Greenwich Ave., Pontiac, RI (1956)[85]
  • Rhode Island State Police Barracks, 1116 Putnam Pk., Chepachet, RI (1956)[86]

In Connecticut:

In Massachusetts:

In New York:

Works of Jackson & Robertson and Fraser & Henthorne[edit]

As Jackson & Robertson:

As Fraser & Henthorne:

  • Austin T. Levy School, 135 Harrisville Main St., Harrisville, RI (1959)[94]
  • Woodward Hall, 9 E. Alumni Ave., University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (1960)[95]
  • Butterfield Hall, 1 Butterfield Rd., University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (1961)[96]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Buildings on Paper: Rhode Island Architectural Drawings 1825-1945 (1982)
  2. ^ Buildings on Paper: Rhode Island Architectural Drawings 1825-1945 (1982)
  3. ^ Buildings of Rhode Island (2004)
  4. ^ Buildings of Rhode Island (2004)
  5. ^ American Architects Directory (Bowker, 1962)
  6. ^ http://gowdey.ppsri.org/gowdey/Barnes%20Street/57%20Barnes%20St.pdf
  7. ^ Page 65, The American Contractor (April 18, 1914)
  8. ^ Page 79, The American Contractor (May 2, 1914)
  9. ^ Page 79, The American Contractor (May 2, 1914)
  10. ^ Page 53, Engineering & Contracting (June 24, 1914)
  11. ^ Page 48, The American Contractor (October 30, 1915)
  12. ^ Page 46, The American Contractor (February 26, 1916)
  13. ^ Page 52, The American Contractor (July 24, 1915)
  14. ^ Olney Street-Alumni Avenue NRHP Nomination (1989)
  15. ^ Page 46, The American Contractor (February 26, 1916)
  16. ^ Page 65, America's Religious Architecture (Marilyn J. Chiat, 1997)
  17. ^ PPS Records for 64 East Orchard Avenue
  18. ^ Page 70, The American Contractor (June 24, 1916)
  19. ^ Page 79, The American Contractor (October 7, 1916)
  20. ^ PPS Records for 402 Angell Street
  21. ^ Olney Street-Alumni Avenue NRHP Nomination (1989)
  22. ^ Page 60, The American Contractor (November 18, 1916)
  23. ^ Page 44, The American Contractor (December 23, 1916)
  24. ^ Page 51, The American Contractor (April 13, 1918)
  25. ^ Page 49, The American Contractor (November 15, 1919)
  26. ^ Page 231, The Civic and Architectural Development of Providence, 1636-1950 (John Hutchins Cady, 1957)
  27. ^ Page 49, The American Contractor (November 15, 1919)
  28. ^ Page 61, The American Contractor (March 20, 1920)
  29. ^ Page 461, Domestic Engineering (December 3, 1921), 1918 Providence Atlas, 1937 Providence Atlas
  30. ^ Page 58, The American Contractor (March 18, 1922)
  31. ^ Page 47, The American Contractor (September 2, 1922)
  32. ^ Freeman Plat Historic District NRHP Nomination (1995)
  33. ^ Page 265, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  34. ^ Blackstone Park Historic District NRHP Nomination (1998)
  35. ^ Page 197, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  36. ^ Wayland Historic NRHP Nomination (2005)
  37. ^ Page 265, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  38. ^ Page 162, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  39. ^ Page 61, Downtown Providence: Statewide Historical Preservation Report P-P-5 (May, 1981)
  40. ^ Page 35, Rhode Island: State-Owned Historic Properties (1989)
  41. ^ Page 77, Engineering News-record, Volume 104 (1930)
  42. ^ Blackstone Park Historic District NRHP Nomination (1998)
  43. ^ Page 417, Ironworker, Volume 35 (1935)
  44. ^ Page 178, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  45. ^ http://www.gsa.gov/portal/ext/html/site/hb/category/25431/actionParameter/exploreByBuilding/buildingId/829
  46. ^ http://www.providenceri.com/NewsReleaseArchive/article.php?id=595
  47. ^ Page 286, The Civic and Architectural Development of Providence, 1636-1950 (John Hutchins Cady, 1957)
  48. ^ Page 156, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  49. ^ Page 203, Providence: A Citywide Survey of Historic Resources (Wm. McKenzie Woodward, 1986)
  50. ^ Hope Village Historic District NRHP Nomination (1995)
  51. ^ Hope Village Historic District NRHP Nomination (1995)
  52. ^ Page 41, The American Contractor (August 11, 1917)
  53. ^ Lonsdale Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  54. ^ Harrisville Mill Village Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  55. ^ Page 34, The American Contractor (September 21, 1918)
  56. ^ Page 60, The American Contractor (February 22, 1919)
  57. ^ Page 45, The American Contractor (November 22, 1919)
  58. ^ Page 55, The American Contractor (June 19, 1920)
  59. ^ http://www.preservation.ri.gov/pdfs_zips_downloads/survey_pdfs/north_kingstown.pdf
  60. ^ Page 53, The American Contractor (November 12, 1921)
  61. ^ http://sos.ri.gov/rihrab/libraries.html
  62. ^ Page 49, The American Contractor (September 30, 1922)
  63. ^ Page 204, Electrical World, Volume 88 (1926)
  64. ^ Page 93, Domestic Engineering and the Journal of Mechanical Contracting, Volume 118 (1927)
  65. ^ http://www.mdc.net/~dbrier/yawgoog/trails/orange.html
  66. ^ Page 3, Rhode Island: State-Owned Historic Properties (1989)
  67. ^ Page 342, American Machinist, Volume 73 (1930)
  68. ^ Page 4, Rhode Island: State-Owned Historic Properties (1989)
  69. ^ Harrisville Mill Village Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  70. ^ Page 421, Buildings of Rhode Island (William H. Jordy, 2004)
  71. ^ Harrisville Mill Village Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  72. ^ Harrisville Mill Village Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  73. ^ Page 3, Rhode Island: State-Owned Historic Properties (1989)
  74. ^ Harrisville Mill Village Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  75. ^ Page 205, Newport Through its Architecture (James L. Yarnall, 2005)
  76. ^ Harrisville Mill Village Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  77. ^ Page 39, Rhode Island: State-Owned Historic Properties (1989)
  78. ^ Page 72, East Providence, Rhode Island: Statewide Preservation Report P-EP-1 (RIHPC, 1976)
  79. ^ Harrisville Mill Village Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  80. ^ Page 41, Rhode Island: State-Owned Historic Properties (1989)
  81. ^ Page 421, Buildings of Rhode Island (William H. Jordy, 2004)
  82. ^ Page 130, Engineering News-Record, Volume 125, Issue 1 (1940)
  83. ^ Page 28, Engineering News-Record, Volume 140, Part 1 (1948)
  84. ^ Harrisville Mill Village Historic District NRHP Nomination (1984)
  85. ^ Page 323, Buildings of Rhode Island (William H. Jordy, 2004)
  86. ^ Page 3, Rhode Island: State-Owned Historic Properties (1989)
  87. ^ Page 47, The American Contractor (July 21, 1917)
  88. ^ Page 81, The Architectural Forum, Volume 56 (1932)
  89. ^ http://mysticarts.org/about/our-history/
  90. ^ Page 78, The American Contractor (June 17, 1916)
  91. ^ Page 54, The American Contractor (October 2, 1920)
  92. ^ http://www.fs.cornell.edu/fs/facinfo/fs_facilinfo.cfm?facil_cd=2021
  93. ^ Page 613, The Bridgemen's Magazine, Volume 11 (1911)
  94. ^ Page 226, American Architects Directory (Bowker, 1962)
  95. ^ Page 226, American Architects Directory (Bowker, 1962)
  96. ^ Page 226, American Architects Directory (Bowker, 1962)