Jacques Leclercq

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Jacques Leclercq (1891, Brussels - 1971, Beaufays) was a Belgian Roman Catholic theologian and priest.

Life[edit]

He received a degree in law from the Université Libre de Bruxelles and one in philosophy from the Université catholique de Louvain, and was ordained a priest in 1917. He was a theologian and a professor at the Facultés universitaires Saint-Louis in Brussels, Belgium and the Université catholique de Louvain. In 1926 he founded the revue La Cité chrétienne.

In addition to many publications, Jacques Leclercq helped to found the School of Political and Social Sciences at the Université catholique de Louvain and the Society for Political and Social Studies. In 1955, he founded Centre de Recherches sociologiques. He was a supporter of Vatican II.[1]

From 1945 on he was in favor of the creation of a regional Walloon Christian-inspired movement, Rénovation wallonne, and wrote in 1963 an appeal to Catholics to rally to the movement, titled Les catholiques et la question wallonne ("Catholics and the Walloon question").[1]

The building that houses the School of Political and Social Sciences at the Université catholique de Louvain is named for him.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Jacques Leclercq". Institut Destrée (in French). Retrieved 2009-09-25. 

Publications[edit]

  • La conscience chrétienne devant l'impôt, in La Revue Nouvelle,15 February 1954, Casterman.