Jadwiga Jędrzejowska

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Jadwiga Jędrzejowska
Country  Poland
Born (1912-10-15)15 October 1912
Kraków, Austria-Hungary
Died 28 February 1980(1980-02-28) (aged 67)
Katowice, Poland
Singles
Highest ranking No.3 (1937)
Grand Slam Singles results
French Open F (1939)
Wimbledon F (1937)
US Open F (1937)
Doubles
Grand Slam Doubles results
French Open W (1939)
US Open F (1938)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
French Open F (1947)

Jadwiga ("Jed") Jędrzejowska [jadˈviɡa jɛndʐɛˈjɔfska] (15 October 1912 – 28 February 1980) was a Polish tennis player. Because her name was difficult to pronounce for many people who did not speak Polish, she was often called by the nicknames "Jed" or "Ja-Ja".

Jędrzejowska reached the singles final of a Grand Slam tournament on three occasions, still a record for Polish tennis. In 1937 she lost to Dorothy Round in Wimbledon final and at the US Championships later that year she was defeated in the final by Anita Lizana. In 1939 she was a runner-up at the French Championships, losing in the final to Simone Mathieu.

In women's doubles, Jędrzejowska won the 1939 French Championships with Mathieu, defeating Alice Florian and Hella Kovac in the final 7–5, 7–5. Jędrzejowska's record in other Grand Slam women's doubles finals was as follows:

In the mixed doubles final at the 1947 French Championships, Jędrzejowska and Christian Caralulis lost to Eric Sturgess and Sheila Summers 6–0, 6–0.

At the age of 44, Jędrzejowska reached the women's doubles quarterfinals of the 1957 French Championships with partner Pilar Barril.

According to Wallis Myers and John Olliff of The Daily Telegraph and The Daily Mail, Jędrzejowska was ranked in the world top ten from 1936 through 1939 (no rankings issued from 1940 through 1945), reaching a career high of World No. 3 in those rankings in 1937.[1]

Grand Slam finals[edit]

Singles: 3 (3 runner-ups)[edit]

Result Year Championship Opponent Score
Runner-up 1937 Wimbledon Championships United Kingdom Dorothy Round 2–6, 6–2, 5–7
Runner-up 1937 U.S. Championships Chile Anita Lizana 4–6, 2–6
Runner-up 1939 French Championships France Simone Mathieu 3–6, 6–8

Doubles: 3 (1 title, 2 runners-up)[edit]

Result Year Championship Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1936 French Championships United Kingdom Susan Noel France Simone Mathieu
United Kingdom Billie Yorke
6–2, 4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 1938 US Championships France Simone Mathieu United States Sarah Palfrey
United States Alice Marble
8–6, 4–6, 3–6
Winner 1939 French Championships France Simone Mathieu Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Alice Florian
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Hella Kovac
7–5, 7–5

Mixed doubles: 1 (1 title)[edit]

Result Year Championship Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1947 French Championships Romania Cristea Caralulis South Africa Sheila Piercey
South Africa Eric Sturgess
0–6, 0–6

Grand Slam singles tournament timeline[edit]

Tournament 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941–1944 1945 19461 19471 1948 Career SR
Australia A A A A A A A A A A NH NH A A A 0 / 0
France 2R A 1R 3R A 3R SF A F NH R A 3R 3R 1R 0 / 9
Wimbledon 1R 3R 3R 4R QF SF F QF QF NH NH NH A 2R A 0 / 10
United States A A A A A A F QF A A A A A A A 0 / 2
SR 0 / 2 0 / 1 0 / 2 0 / 2 0 / 1 0 / 2 0 / 3 0 / 2 0 / 2 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 2 0 / 1 0 / 21

NH = tournament not held.

R = tournament restricted to French nationals and held under German occupation.

A = did not participate in the tournament.

SR = the ratio of the number of Grand Slam singles tournaments won to the number of those tournaments played.

1In 1946 and 1947, the French Championships were held after Wimbledon.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Collins, Bud (2008). The Bud Collins History of Tennis: An Authoritative Encyclopedia and Record Book. New York, N.Y: New Chapter Press. p. 702. ISBN 0-942257-41-3. 

External links[edit]

  • Le coup droit (French site, Jedrzejowska's tennis style appears in "Pologne")
Awards
Preceded by
Poland Roger Verey
Polish Sportspersonality of the Year
1936 – 1937
Succeeded by
Poland Stanisław Marusarz