Swati (Pashtun tribe)

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The Swati is a tribe dwelling in the districts of Mansehra, Batgram, Shangla, Torghar, Elum (Swat), Dir, Bajaur Agency and Malakand of the Khyber Pukhtunkhwa province of Pakistan.

The province is mountainous, and home to historical places such as Pakhli (Lower Pakhal/Upper Pakhal), Agror, Thakot, Balakot, Kaghan, Black Mountain (Torghar) and Allai.[citation needed]

History and origin of the name[edit]

The term "Swati" refers to a large tribe of mixed origins[1] which occupied the area of Elum (present Swat), Dir, Bajuar, Malakand, Pakhli Sarkar, presently Hazara Division and parts of Kashmir.[citation needed]

Tribal divisions[edit]

Swatis are divided into three great clans, Ghebri, Mamiali and Mitravi of which the first claim to be Tajik, the Mamiali Yousafzai Pashtun, and the Mitravi claims to be of Durrani origin. But, it's very difficult to recognize and segregate the tribes of Swatis on the basis of blood except for Jahangeeris (Khans of Mansehra town) who are considered to be Old Swatis of Swat by the other Swati tribes.

The Ghebri, a section of upper Pakhli, occupy Kaghan, Balakot, Ghari Habibullah, Mansehra, Dhodial, Shinkiari, Batagram, Thakot and Konsh while the Mamiali and Mitravi dwell in Bherkund, Agror, Takri and Deshi. The Allai have a mosaic population from all the tribes. These groups have been further divided into many subsections and Khels.

Swatis are bilinguals, speaking Hindko in addition to their mother tongue Pushto. They observe the Pathan code of honor Pukhtoonwali very strictly and call it Swatiwali.

Sub-tribes[edit]

The Swatis are divided into many sub-tribes: Jehangiris, Iznali, Arghoshal, Malkal,Torkhel,Mitrawi, Sarkhailee, Mamya or Mamaili, and Lughmani.[2]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ India. Army. Intelligence Branch (1983). Frontier and Overseas Expeditions from India: pt. 1. Tribes north of the Kabul River. pt. 2. Supplement. Mittal Publications. p. 84. 
  2. ^ http://cdn-cache.worldlibrary.org/article/WHEBN0026951271/Swati%20%28Pashtun%20tribe%29
  3. ^ Afghan, Azmaray. Khyber.ORG. Swati. Published on 5-9-2009. Retrieved on 19-6-2012.