Jaimie Leonarder

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Jaimie Leonarder (born 1958, Sydney) also known as Jay Katz is an Australian musician, archivist, social worker, film critic, radio announcer, and DJ.[1]

Biography[edit]

Born and raised in Sydney, Leonarder attended Artarmon Public School and Crows-Nest Boys High School. He is the second of four children. His younger sister Jennine was Australia's representative in the 1987 Miss Universe Competition.

Leonarder trained as a nurse studying both general and psychiatric nursing and has worked in welfare, as a youth worker, a diversional therapist, and managing the Hurstville C.Y.S.S. centre.

Leonarder formed an experimental noise rock band called the Mu Mesons (1982–1999),[2] and he still works as a DJ and occasionally puts on the "The Sounds of Seduction" night club.

In 1982, Leonarder was also a founding member of The Loop Orchestra, a reel-to-reel tape machine band with fellow artists John Blades, Ron Brown and ex-Severed Heads member, Richard Fielding.[3]

He was the subject of the documentary film Love & Anarchy: The Wild Wild World of Jaimie Leonarder.

With Fenella Kernebone and Megan Spencer in 2005 and 2006, Leonarder co-hosted The Movie Show, a film criticism show broadcast on SBS television.

He hosted The Naked City (a radio show on FBi Radio in Sydney) along with his wife Miss Death and Coffin Ed until 2010.

He hosts the weekly Cult Sinema night at the Annandale Hotel in Sydney and shows films and documentaries at his private cinema, the Mu-Meson Archives.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Love and Anarchy". Music Australia. National Library of Australia. 3 November 2005. Retrieved 19 February 2010. 
  2. ^ Spencer, Chris; Zbig Nowara, Paul McHenry with notes by Ed Nimmervoll (2002) [1987]. "MU MESONS". The Who's Who of Australian Rock. Noble Park, Vic.: Five Mile Press. ISBN 1-86503-891-1. Retrieved 19 February 2010.  Note: [on-line] version established at White Room Electronic Publishing Pty Ltd in 2007 and was expanded from the 2002 edition.
  3. ^ Andrews, Ian; John Blades (consultation) (2009). "The Lost Decade: Post-Punk, Experimental and Industrial Music". In Gail Priest. Experimental music : audio explorations in Australia. Sydney, N.S.W.: UNSW Press. p. 47. ISBN 978-1-921410-07-9. 

External links[edit]