Jakob Rosenhain

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Jakob Rosenhain

Jakob Rosenhain (Jacob, Jacques) (2 December 1813 in Mannheim[1] – 21 March 1894 in Baden-Baden)[2] was a Jewish and German pianist and composer of classical music.

Rosenhain made his debut at the age of 11.[2] During their 1837 season, he was a soloist with the London Philharmonic Orchestra (on April 17), which in 1854 (also in April) programmed one of his symphonies.[3][4]

He worked with Johann Baptist Cramer on a published school of piano-playing. From 1849 he made his home in Paris.[5]

He was a friend of Felix Mendelssohn at least from 1839.[3]

Selected compositions[edit]

Four operas
[6]
  • Der Besuch in Irrenhause (1834)
  • Liswenna (1835)
  • Le Démon de la Nuit (1851); Liswenna rewritten
  • Volage et Jaloux (1863)
Orchestra
  • Symphony No. 1 in G minor, op. 42[6]
  • Symphony No. 2 in F minor, op. 43 (performed, possibly premiered, 1846 by Mendelssohn in Leipzig)[3][7]
  • Symphony No. 3 "Im Frühling", op. 61[6]
Concertante
  • Piano Concerto in D minor, op. 73[8][9]
Chamber works
  • Piano Quartet in E, op. 1[10]
  • Sonata in E for piano with violoncello or violin, op. 38[11]
  • Piano Sonata in F minor, op. 44?; à M. Fétis[12]
  • Sonate Symphonique in F minor (Piano Sonata No.2?), Op.70 (pub. Breitkopf, 1887)
  • Piano Sonata (No.3?) in D, Op.74 (published by Breitkopf, 1886)
  • 3 String Quartets, op. 55, 57, 65 (pub. 1864)[13]
  • Sonata in D minor for cello and piano, op. 98[14]
  • Sonata in D minor for viola and piano (manuscript, may be same as above? noted in RISM and dates from 1893)
  • Four Piano Trios[15]
Songs
  • At least 2 dozen[16]

External links[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Meyers Konversationslexikon, Band 13, Seite 190, Leipzig, 1889
  2. ^ a b Musical Times at Google Books, April 21, 1894 issue. Obituary, p. 378.
  3. ^ a b c Musical Times at Google Books, volume 40, 1899. August 1, 1899 issue. Published by Novello. pages 530-1. Discusses letters between Rosenhain and Mendelssohn from August 1839.
  4. ^ List of works performed by the Philharmonic Society.
  5. ^ See Pratt, Mendel (1907)
  6. ^ a b c See Brown (1886).
  7. ^ "Library of Congress Permalink for Second Symphony, Sommermeyer Edition". Retrieved 2009-01-17. 
  8. ^ "Library of Congress Permalink for Piano Concerto, Breitkopf & Härtel Edition". Retrieved 2009-01-17. 
  9. ^ "1890-2 Crystal Palace Sunday Concerts, Including First English Performance of Rosenhain Piano Concerto". Retrieved 2009-01-28. 
  10. ^ "Piano Quartets Page" (in Dutch). Retrieved 2009-01-19. 
  11. ^ at IMSLP.
  12. ^ Scanned in at Bayerische Staatsbibliothek Site, in References. Op.41 is mentioned in HMB as another work entirely from 1845, and op.44 in F minor seems to be Rosenhain's first sonata - so this may be a typo or misreading on someone's part (it seemed to be op.41, but now am assuming this should be op.44).
  13. ^ Publication of all 3 quartets by Richault mentioned, together with dedicatees (Rossini, Vieuxtemps, Jean Becker), in the Bibliographie de la France, 2e série, 53e année, nº 48, 26 Novembre 1864, p.562, registration 2854.
  14. ^ HMB gives a cello sonata here and RISM (opac.rism.info) gives a manuscript D minor viola sonata from 1893, but these may be the same work
  15. ^ Hubbard, p. 235.
  16. ^ See the Ezust Lied and Art Song Texts Page, in References.

References[edit]