Jamaica Inn (novel)

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Jamaica Inn
Jamaica Inn novel.jpg
The first UK edition
Author Daphne du Maurier
Genre Murder mystery
Publisher Gollancz (UK)
Doubleday Doran (US)
Publication date
1936

Jamaica Inn is a novel by the English writer Daphne du Maurier, first published in 1936. It was later made into a film, also called Jamaica Inn, directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It is an eerie period piece set in Cornwall in 1820; the real Jamaica Inn still exists and is a pub in the middle of Bodmin Moor.[1] The plot follows a group of murderous wreckers who run ships aground, kill the sailors and steal the cargo.

Synopsis[edit]

Jamaica Inn tells the story of 20 year-old Mary Yellan, who was brought up on a farm in Helford but has to go and live with her Aunt Patience after her mother dies. Patience's husband, Joss Merlyn, a great big bully who is almost seven feet tall, is the keeper of Jamaica Inn. On arriving at the gloomy and threatening inn, Mary finds her aunt in a ghost-like state under the thumb of the vicious Joss, and soon realises that something unusual is afoot at the inn, which has no guests and is never open to the public. She tries to squeeze the truth out of her uncle during one of his benders, but he tells her, "I'm not drunk enough to tell you why I live in this God-forgotten spot, and why I'm the landlord of Jamaica Inn."

Against her better judgement, Mary becomes attracted to Joss's younger brother, Jem, a petty thief, but less brutal than his big brother. After Mary realises that Joss is the leader of a band of wreckers and even overhears Joss ordering the murder of one of their members, she is unsure whether to trust Jem or not. She turns to Francis Davey, the albino vicar of the neighbouring village of Altarnun, who happened to find Mary when she got lost one day on the moor.

Mary and Jem leave the moors for Christmas Eve and spend a day together in the town of Launceston, during which Jem sells a horse he stole from Squire Bassat back to the squire's unwitting wife. When it comes time to return to Jamaica Inn, Jem leaves Mary to get the jingle,[a] but never returns. Mary hires a coach to take her home wherein she meets Francis Davey, but they are waylaid by her uncle's band of wreckers, and the coach driver is killed. Mary is then forced to watch as the wreckers trick a ship into steering itself on to the rocks and then murder the survivors of the shipwreck as they swim ashore.

A few days later, Jem comes to speak with Mary, who is locked in her room at the inn. Mary uses Jem's help to escape and goes to Altarnun to tell the vicar about Joss's misdeeds, but he isn't at home. She then goes to the squire's home and tells his wife her story, but Mrs Bassat tells Mary that her husband already has the evidence to arrest Joss and has gone to do so. Mrs Bassat has her driver take Mary to Jamaica Inn, where they arrive before the Squire's party. Mary goes inside to find her uncle stabbed to death; the lawmen arrive soon thereafter and discover Aunt Patience similarly murdered.

The vicar arrives at the inn, having received a note Mary left for him that afternoon, and offers her refuge for the night. The next day, Mary surreptitiously sees a drawing by the vicar which she found in a drawer of the desk in her room at the vicar's cottage; she is shocked to see that the vicar has drawn himself as a wolf while the members of his congregation have heads of sheep. The vicar returns, tells Mary that Jem was the one who informed on Joss. Realizing that she has seen the drawing, the vicar then reveals that he was the true head of the wrecker gang and the murderer of Joss and her Aunt Patience, and he tries to escape with Mary as his hostage. The vicar goes on to explain that he tried to find faith in the Christian Church but did not, setting his faith instead in the ancient Druid following. As they flee across the moor to try to reach a ship to sail to Spain, Squire Bassat and Jem lead a search party that closes the gap, eventually coming close enough for Jem to shoot the vicar and rescue Mary.

Mary has an offer to work as a servant for the Bassats, but instead plans to return to Helford. One day as she walks on the moor, she comes across Jem, leading a cart with all of his possessions, headed in the other direction from Helford. After some discussion, Mary decides to abandon Helford to go with Jem.

Jamaica Inn in other media[edit]

  • A film adaptation of the novel was produced in 1939, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring Charles Laughton and Maureen O'Hara. The film differs from the book in some respects, with Francis Davey being replaced by a Squire Pengallon (Laughton). Du Maurier was not enamoured of the production.[2]
  • First known stage adaption of Jamaica Inn was by David Horlock and performed in Salisbury Playhouse in 1990.
  • Another adaptation by John King was performed at the Regent Centre in 1993 and is due to be performed again in February 2009.[3]
  • There is a 2004 stage adaptation of Jamaica Inn by Lisa Evans, which has been performed as recently as 26 May 2007, at Newcastle-Under-Lyme's New Vic theatre, with the critically acclaimed Juliette Goodman starring in the lead role of Mary Yellan.[4]
  • The track "Jamaica Inn" on singer Tori Amos's 2005 album The Beekeeper, a song about "a man and a woman falling out", references the du Maurier novel and the wreckers of north Cornwall.[5]
  • In a 12 June 2012 interview with Rolling stone, Neil Peart of the rock band Rush, describes how the theme of the wreckers plays throughout the band's 2012 studio release, Clockwork Angels.[6]
  • Jamaica Inn is an adaptation of the novel for BBC One, first broadcast on 21 April 2014.
  • The track "A Smuggler's Tale" from the album Albion of the British Melodic Hard Rock band Ten is also based on the novel.[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ jingle was a west of England term for a form of two-wheeled, horse-drawn tub cart or dray in common use in the nineteenth century.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paschke, Jean (March 2007). "The Cornwall of Daphne du Maurier". British Heritage (Weider History Group). Retrieved 11 November 2007. 
  2. ^ Duguid, Mark. "Jamaica Inn (1939)". filmonline. British Film Institute. Retrieved 11 November 2007. 
  3. ^ "Jamaica Inn 1993 and 2009". 
  4. ^ Orme, Steve. "Jamaica Inn". The British Theatre Guide. Peter Lathan. Retrieved 11 November 2007. 
  5. ^ Orloff, Brian (31 March 2005). "Musings of a musical maverick". St. Petersburg Times (Times Publishing Company). Retrieved 11 November 2007. 
  6. ^ Greene, Andy (12 June 2012). "Q&A: Neil Peart on Rush's New LP and Being a 'Bleeding Heart Libertarian'". Rolling Stone Magazine (Jann Wenner). Retrieved 13 June 2012. 
  7. ^ [issuu.com/rickpalin/docs/issue_25/1?e=0 Firebrand Magazine Review]

External links[edit]