James Andrew Thomas Bruce

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Admiral
Sir James Andrew Thomas Bruce
KCMG
Born (1846-07-15)15 July 1846
Died 25 May 1921(1921-05-25) (aged 74)
Allegiance  United Kingdom
Service/branch  Royal Navy
Rank Admiral
Relations Sir Henry Hervey Bruce, 3rd Baronet
Marianne Margaret Clifton (Parents)

Admiral Sir James Andrew Thomas Bruce, KCMG (15 July 1846 – 25 May 1921) was an officer in the Royal Navy, who was second in command of the British fleet on the China Station during the Boxer Rebellion.

Background[edit]

Bruce was born on 15 July 1846, the son of Rt. Hon. Sir Sir Henry Hervey Bruce, 3rd Baronet and Marianne Margaret Clifton.[1]

Naval career[edit]

He served in the Niger Campaign in 1871.[1]

During the Boxer Rebellion, Rear-Admiral Bruce was second in command of British fleet on the China Station. His flagship was the battleship Barfleur, and his flag captain was George Warrender. Barfleur took part in Allied operations in north China in 1899 and 1900, and between 31 May 1900 and September 1900 supported the storming of the Peking forts and the relief of the foreign legations at Tientsin.[2]

The British fleet during the Boxer rebellion[edit]

The British fleet on the China Station in March 1901 was commanded by Vice-Admiral Sir Edward H. Seymour, G.C.B. in the Centurion, with Rear-Admiral Sir James A.T. Bruce, K.C.M.G. second in command,[3] and consisted of:[4]

** Ordered home. ‡ Temporarily attached to China Station.

Bruce was appointed a Knight Commander of the Order of St. Michael and St. George (KCMG) in 1900 for his services in China.[1]

Barfleur ended her China Station service in November 1901, departing Hong Kong on 11 November 1901[6] and arriving at Plymouth on 31 December 1901.[7] She paid off at Devonport on 22 January 1902, and Sir James Bruce was received in audience by King Edward VII a week later.[8]

Later life[edit]

He died aged 74, on 25 May 1921.[1]

Family[edit]

He married Catherine Mary Philippa Wodehouse, daughter of Colonel Edwin Wodehouse and Catherine Street, on 27 June 1877. There were no children from this marriage. He had an illegitimate daughter, Olive Christian, by Susan Christian in 1874. Olive Christian married Algernon Samuel Wigmore of Cobham and Stoke D'Abernon, Surrey, in 1898. She died, aged 52, on 21 November 1926. Olive Christian Wigmore is interred in the Churchyard of Stoke D'Abernon.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e thepeerage.com
  2. ^ Burt, R. A. (1988). British Battleships 1889-1904. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-061-0. , page 99
  3. ^ a b Navy List March 1901, corrected to 18 February 1901, page 217
  4. ^ Navy List March 1901, corrected to 18 February 1901, page 218
  5. ^ The name of this ship is given as HMS Redpole in the 1901 Navy List, but HMS Redpoll in Conways 1860-1905.
  6. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence" The Times (London). Wednesday, 13 November 1901. (36611), p. 11.
  7. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence" The Times (London). Wednesday, 1 January 1902. (36653), p. 4.
  8. ^ "Court circular" The Times (London). Friday, 31 January 1902. (36679), p. 8.