James Bartleman

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For the singer, see James Bartleman (singer).
The Honourable
James Karl Bartleman
OC OOnt BA
JamesBartlemanSpeakingAtYPI-LeadersTodayEvent.JPG
The Honourable James Bartleman speaking at the YPI/Leaders Today Event at the Carlu in Downtown Toronto
27th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario
In office
7 March 2002 – 5 September 2007
Monarch Elizabeth II
Governor General Adrienne Clarkson
Michaëlle Jean
Premier Mike Harris
Ernie Eves
Dalton McGuinty
Preceded by Hilary Weston
Succeeded by David Onley
Personal details
Born (1939-12-24) 24 December 1939 (age 74)
Orillia, Ontario
Spouse(s) Marie-Jeanne Rosillon (m. 1975)[1]

James Karl Bartleman, OC OOnt (born 24 December 1939 in Orillia, Ontario) is a Canadian diplomat, author, and was the 27th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario from 2002 to 2007.

James Bartleman grew up in the Muskoka town of Port Carling, and is a member of the Chippewas of Mnjikaning First Nation. In 1963, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree (BA) in History from the University of Western Ontario, where he was initiated as a member of Phi Delta Theta.

Since 2007, Bartleman has been the Chancellor of the Ontario College of Art and Design (OCAD) in Toronto, Ontario.

Foreign service career[edit]

Prior to taking on the role of Lieutenant-Governor, Mr. Bartleman had a distinguished career of more than 35 years in the Canadian foreign service. He began his diplomatic career in what was then known as the Department of External Affairs (now the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade) in 1967. In 1972 he was given the task of opening Canada’s first diplomatic mission in the newly independent People’s Republic of Bangladesh . He was then made Canada's Ambassador to Cuba (Havana) from 1981 to 1983. Upon his return from Cuba, he was appointed as director of security and intelligence for the Department of External Affairs.[2] After this, Bartleman served as High Commissioner to Cyprus and Ambassador to Israel (Tel Aviv) simultaneously from 1986 to 1990. From the dual posting he moved to post of Canadian Ambassador to the North Atlantic Council of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) in Brussels, Belgium from 1990 to 1994. He was moved from NATO to the Commonwealth of Nations positions as High Commissioner to South Africa (Pretoria) in 1998-1999 and to Australia (Canberra) in 1999-2000. Finally, he was transferred back to Europe to serve as Ambassador to the European Union in Brussels, Belgium from 2000 to 2002.

Bartleman was director of security and intelligence for the Department of External Affairs at the time of the Air India Bombing. On 3 May 2007, he testified at the Air India Inquiry that he had presented an intelligence document to the RCMP warning of a possible attack days prior to the bombing.[3] Bob Rae later admitted that he never bothered to interview Bartleman, the former head of intelligence for Foreign Affairs Canada while investigating the Air India bombing.[4]

Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario[edit]

The Honourable James Karl Bartleman was sworn in as the 27th Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario on 7 March 2002 as Ontario's 41st Vice-regal representative (27th since confederation, 41st since the establishment of the post in 1792).

As is traditional to a vice-regal appointment, Mr. Bartleman has used his position to spearhead three initiatives that he personally identifies with and considers important. During his mandate as Lieutenant Governor he sought to:

  1. Reduce the stigma of mental illness
  2. Fight racism and discrimination
  3. Promote literacy among First Nations children.

To these ends, he initiated the Lieutenant-Governor's Book Program in 2004. He has collected over 1.2 million books, donated from all corners of the province from both institutions and individuals, to stock school libraries in First Nations communities, particularly in Northern Ontario. In 2005, to further promote literacy and bridge building, His Honour initiated a program to pair up Native and non-Native schools in Ontario and Nunavut, and set-up summer camps for literacy development in five northern First Nations communities.[5]

Honours[edit]

Awards[edit]

  • Rotary Youth Impact Award for Lifetime Achievement, 25 January 2008, by the Rotary Club of Toronto West
  • On 1 June 2002, he was invested as a Knight of Justice in the Order of St John
  • On 1 June 2002, as Lieutenant-Governor he received the Order of Ontario and became the Order's Chancellor.
  • Bartleman was awarded the National Aboriginal Achievement Award for public service in 1999.[6]
  • The Dr. Hugh Lefave Award
  • The Courage to Come Back Award
  • The Deloitte Hero Inspiration Award
  • The Jane Chamberlin Award for his efforts to reduce the stigma of mental illness.
  • The Phi Delta Kappa Educator of the Year Award
  • The DAREarts Cultural Award in recognition of the Lieutenant Governor's Book Program.
  • In 2011, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada "for his contributions to his country, notably as lieutenant governor, and as a champion of mental health, literacy and poverty reduction"[7]

Honorary doctorates[edit]

Honorific eponyms[edit]

Awards

Bibliography[edit]

  • Out of Muskoka (2002)
  • On Six Continents (2004)
  • Rollercoaster: My Hectic Years as Jean Chrétien's Diplomatic Advisor (2005)
  • Raisin Wine: A Boyhood in a Different Muskoka (2007)
  • As Long as the Rivers Flow (2011)
  • The Redemption of Oscar Wolf (2013)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "St. Paul's College to install James Bartleman as honorary chair". University of Waterloo. 9 October 2007. Retrieved 23 March 2009. 
  2. ^ Gloria Galloway and Paul Koring (5 May 2007). "How one warning ricocheted through government". Globe and Mail. Retrieved 5 May 2007. 
  3. ^ "I warned RCMP days before Air India disaster: Bartleman". CBC News. 3 May 2007. Retrieved 5 May 2007. 
  4. ^ Les Whittington, "Rae didn't talk about attack with Bartleman", "Toronto Star", 7 May 2007.
  5. ^ Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario: The Honourable James K. Bartleman, O.Ont., 27th Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario
  6. ^ High Commissioner James K. Bartleman, Public Service at National Aboriginal Achievement Awards
  7. ^ "Appointments to the Order of Canada". 
  8. ^ Office of the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario & the Central Agencies I&IT Cluster, Customer Solutions Delivery Branch. "The Lieutenant Governor of Ontario - Recent Lieutenant Governors". Retrieved 30 August 2010. 

External links[edit]

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Gary Richard Harman
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Cuba
1981-1983
Succeeded by
Kenneth Bryce Williamson
Preceded by
Vernon George Turner
High Commissioner to Cyprus
1985-1990
Succeeded by
Michael Dougall Bell
Preceded by
Vernon George Turner
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Israel
1986-1990
Succeeded by
Michael Dougall Bell
Preceded by
Gordon Scott Smith
Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the North Atlantic Council
1980
Succeeded by
Admiral John R. Anderson
Preceded by
Arthur C. Perron
High Commissioner to South Africa
1984-1987
Succeeded by
Lucie Geneviève Edwards
Preceded by
Arthur C. Perron
High Commissioner to Mauritius
1998-
Succeeded by
Lucie Geneviève Edwards
Preceded by
Arthur C. Perron
High Commissioner to Namibia
1998
Succeeded by
Lucie Geneviève Edwards
Preceded by
Brian Schumacher
High Commissioner to the Solomon Islands
1999-
Succeeded by
Jean T. Fournier
Preceded by
Arthur C. Perron
High Commissioner to Swaziland
1999-
Succeeded by
Lucie Geneviève Edwards
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Arthur C. Perron
High Commissioner to Lesotho
1999-
Succeeded by
Sandelle D. Scrimshaw
Preceded by
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Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Palau
1999-
Succeeded by
Jean T. Fournier
Preceded by
Brian Schumacher
High Commissioner to Australia
1999-2000
Succeeded by
Jean T. Fournier
Preceded by
Brian Schumacher
High Commissioner to Vanuatu
2000-
Succeeded by
Jean T. Fournier
Preceded by
Established
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to the Marshall Islands
2000-
Succeeded by
Jean T. Fournier
Preceded by
Brian Schumacher
High Commissioner to Nauru
2000-
Succeeded by
Jean T. Fournier
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Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Micronesia
2000-
Succeeded by
Jean T. Fournier
Preceded by
Jean-Pierre Juneau
Head of Mission to the European Community
2000-2002
Succeeded by
Jeremy Kinsman