James Celebrezze

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
James Celebrezze
Member of the Ohio House of Representatives
from the 4th district
In office
January 3, 1967-December 31, 1974
Preceded by At-Large District
Succeeded by Rocco Colonna
Personal details
Born (1938-02-06) February 6, 1938 (age 76)
Cleveland, Ohio[1][2]
Political party Democratic

James Patrick Celebrezze (born February 7, 1938) is an American politician and jurist of the Ohio Democratic party, who served as a judge of the Cuyahoga County, Ohio, common pleas court (domestic relations division). His daughter, Leslie Celebrezze was elected to fill his seat after his retirement.

Celebrezze was elected a judge of the Ohio Supreme Court in 1982,[3] defeating Republican Blanche Krupansky. He was defeated in his bid for re-election in 1984[4] by J. Craig Wright. His campaign was negatively affected by charges made against the chief justice, Celebrezze's brother Frank Celebrezze.

Celebrezze is the son of Cleveland politician Frank D. Celebrezze I, the nephew of former Johnson cabinet member Anthony Celebrezze, the first cousin of former gubernatorial candidate Anthony J. Celebrezze Jr., the brother of Ohio Chief Justice Frank Celebrezze, and the uncle of Ohio appeals court Judge Frank D. Celebrezze Jr., and the first cousin once removed of Anthony J. Celebrezze III.

Two of Celebrezze's three children have recently began their political careers: daughter Leslie Ann Celebrezze, formerly a Magistrate for Cleveland Municipal Court, is now a judge on the Cuyahoga County Domestic Relations bench. His youngest son, Nicholas J. Celebrezze, served as a Councilman in the city of Parma, Ohio and now serves as the State Representative from the 15th District in the Ohio House of Representatives. Nick Celebrezze and his father work together as practicing attorneys in the Celebrezze Group, LLC. His first son, James Celebrezze, currently is employed at a Pittsburgh hospital as head colorectal surgeon.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ Lamis, Alexander P.; Sharkey, Mary Anne (1994-10-01). Ohio politics. Kent State University Press. pp. 292–. ISBN 978-0-87338-509-1. Retrieved 23 May 2011. 
  4. ^ Lamb, Chris (2004). Drawn to extremes: the use and abuse of editorial cartoons. Columbia University Press. pp. 186–. ISBN 978-0-231-13067-7. Retrieved 23 May 2011.