James Driscoll

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For the Chief Clerk of California Assembly, see James D. Driscoll.
James Driscoll
— Golfer —
Personal information
Born (1977-10-09) October 9, 1977 (age 37)
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg)
Nationality  United States
Career
College University of Virginia
Turned professional 2001
Former tour(s) PGA Tour
Professional wins 1
Number of wins by tour
Web.com Tour 1
Best results in major championships
Masters Tournament CUT: 2001
U.S. Open CUT: 2005
The Open Championship CUT: 2009, 2012
PGA Championship DNP

James Driscoll (born October 9, 1977) is an American professional golfer who played on the PGA Tour.

Amateur career[edit]

Driscoll was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the youngest of seven children. He grew up in Brookline, Massachusetts outside of Boston. He started golf at a young age and won the Club Championship at his home club of Charles River age 15. James won the Massachusetts Junior Championship a year later. He then went on to defeat the state's best golfers at the Massachusetts State Amateur Championship in 1996 at the age of 18 and then again in 1998.[1] He was the youngest winner ever of the Massachusetts Amateur and showed much promise at a young age. By the summer of 1996 James was the second-ranked junior in the country, and that is when he made his first cameo on the national stage, losing the final of the U.S. Junior to Scott Hailes.[2]

Driscoll attended Brookline High School, Brookline, Massachusetts and then attended The Taft School in Watertown, Connecticut, for a postgraduate year[3] and went on to the University of Virginia where he was named to the Virginia first-team All-State golf team his senior year.[4] He lost to Jeff Quinney in the finals of the 2000 U.S. Amateur at Baltusrol Golf Club in Springfield Township, Union County, New Jersey. He had upset Englishman Luke Donald in the semifinals 2&1 and made an inspiring comeback in the final being 3 down with three to play. Driscoll was eventually defeated on the 39th hole by Quinney. His runner-up finish gave him an invitation to the 2001 Masters Tournament. At the Masters Driscoll fired a 68 in the first round, marking the best opening round by an amateur since Ken Venturi's 66 in 1956. His playing partner Tom Watson said, "This was the best round I've seen here by an amateur."[2] Driscoll shot 78 in the second round to miss the cut by one stroke. He was a member of the 2001 Walker Cup team.

Professional career[edit]

Driscoll turned professional in 2001. He won his first and only professional event at the 2004 Nationwide Tour event the Virginia Beach Open. He has been on and off the PGA Tour for a couple years, but his top 25 finish on the 2007 Nationwide Tour money list has given him PGA Tour membership for 2008. Driscoll was runner-up at the PGA Tour's Zurich Classic of New Orleans in 2005. James lost to Tim Petrovic in a sudden-death playoff after missing a birdie putt on the final green of regulation for the win. He had his second runner-up finish on the 2009 Valero Texas Open, losing to Zach Johnson in a sudden-death playoff.

Amateur wins (9)[edit]

Professional wins (1)[edit]

PGA Tour playoff record (0–2)

No. Year Tournament Opponent Result
1 2005 Zurich Classic of New Orleans Tim Petrovic Lost to par on first extra hole
2 2009 Valero Texas Open Zach Johnson Lost to birdie on first extra hole

Nationwide Tour (1)[edit]

No. Date Tournament Winning score Margin of victory Runners-up
1 Sep 12, 2004 Virginia Beach Open −15 (70-69-66-68=273) 4 strokes United States Jason Buha, United States Kyle Thompson,
United States Jimmy Walker

Results in major championships[edit]

Tournament 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Masters Tournament CUT DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
U.S. Open DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT DNP DNP DNP DNP
The Open Championship DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT
PGA Championship DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Tournament 2010 2011 2012
Masters Tournament DNP DNP DNP
U.S. Open DNP DNP DNP
The Open Championship DNP DNP CUT
PGA Championship DNP DNP DNP

DNP = Did not play
CUT = missed the half-way cut
"T" = tied
Yellow background for top-10.

U.S. national team appearances[edit]

Amateur

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]