James Dyson Award

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The James Dyson Award is an international student design award, organised and run by the James Dyson Foundation charitable trust. The contest is open to university level students (or recent graduates) in the fields of product design, industrial design and engineering, who "design something that solves a problem".[1]

The students must have studied in one of the following countries: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States.

Nine national winners are chosen from each country. Dyson selects an international winner for the overall prize. Previous winners have included Michael Chen, winner of the James Dyson Award 2008, who designed the 'Reactiv' cycling jacket. The winning student or team of students receives a £10,000 prize, £10,000 for their university, a trophy, and a certificate.

Winners[edit]

International winners

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.jamesdysonaward.org/Prize.aspx
  2. ^ "Effortless communication". Irish Times. June 11, 2007. Retrieved November 8, 2013. 
  3. ^ "James Dyson Design Award 2007". professionearchitetto.it (in Italian). May 30, 2007. Retrieved November 8, 23. 
  4. ^ Amy-Mae Elliott (April 10, 2008). "Reactiv cycle jacket wins Dyson award". Pocket Lint. Retrieved November 8, 23. 
  5. ^ Cliff Kuang (September 9, 2009). "The Automist Wins 2009 James Dyson Award". Fast Company. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  6. ^ Helen Walters (September 9, 2009). "And the James Dyson Award goes to... Automist, from RCA London graduates". BusinessWeek. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  7. ^ Richard Tyler (May 10, 2012). "Sir James Dyson backs kitchen taps to save lives and launches 2010 competition". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  8. ^ Charlie Sorrel (October 5, 2010). "‘Longreach’ Lifebuoy-Firing Bazooka Wins James Dyson Award". Wired magazine. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  9. ^ James Hurley (October 5, 2010). ""Buoyancy bazooka" wins James Dyson award". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  10. ^ Chris Shiny (October 5, 2010). "Longreach's livesaving buoyancy aid wins James Dyson innovation award". Tech Digest. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  11. ^ Clay Dillow (November 8, 2011). "Airdrop, Which Harvests Moisture Directly From Desert Air, Wins James Dyson Award". Popular Science. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  12. ^ My Green Australia (November 16, 2011). "Aussie wins the James Dyson Award with AIRDROP". International Business Times. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  13. ^ Daily Mail Reporter (November 8, 2011). "Australian designer wins £10,000 James Dyson award by pulling water out of thin air". Daily Mail. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  14. ^ James Hurley (July 27, 2012). "Dyson’s pick of inventors take on the world". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  15. ^ Ian Tucker (November 19, 2011). "Edward Linacre: it's possible to get water from thin air". The Guardian. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  16. ^ Katie Scott (November 8, 2011). "Airdrop water harvester wins 2011 James Dyson Award". Wired magazine. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  17. ^ Rebecca Smithers (November 8, 2012). "'Humane' fishing net wins Dyson award". The Guardian. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  18. ^ Bob Yirka (August 31, 2012). "High-Tech fishing net finalist for Dyson Award". Phys.org. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  19. ^ Liat Clark (August 30, 2012). "Fish-saving SafetyNet design wins the UK James Dyson award". Wired magazine. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  20. ^ "Titan Arm website". Retrieved November 8, 2013. 
  21. ^ Devin Coldewey (November 6, 2013). "'Titan Arm' exoskeleton empowers heavy lifters and disabled alike". NBC News. Retrieved November 8, 2013. 
  22. ^ Kyle VanHemert (November 7, 2013). "An Exoskeleton That Boosts Biceps Wins James Dyson’s $45,000 Prize". Wired. Retrieved November 8, 2013. 

External links[edit]