James Franklin (printer)

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James Franklin
Born February 4, 1697
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Died February 4, 1735 (age 38)
Newport, Rhode Island
Other names "Poor Robin"
Ethnicity American
Occupation Newspaper/Almanac Printer/Publisher
Notable credit(s) Publisher, New England Courant, one of the oldest and the first truly independent American newspaper
Spouse(s) Ann Smith Franklin
Children 5
Relatives Benjamin Franklin, younger brother

James Franklin (February 4, 1697; Boston – February 4, 1735; Newport, Rhode Island) was an American colonial author, printer, newspaper publisher, and almanac publisher. James published the New England Courant, one of the oldest and the first truly independent American newspaper.

Early years[edit]

James was an older brother of Benjamin Franklin and the son of Josiah Franklin, a chandler from Ecton, Northamptonshire, England, and Abiah Folger Franklin, who came from a family of Nantucket Puritans. In addition to James, their children included: John (1690–1756), Peter (1692–1766), Mary (1694–ca. 1730), Sarah (1699–1731), Ebenezer (1701–1702), Thomas (1703–1706), Benjamin (1706–1790), Lydia (1708–1758), and Jane (1712–1795).[1] James had seven other siblings from his father's earlier marriage.[2] In 1717, James, returned to Boston from England with a Ramage [disambiguation needed] press and a small quantity of type letters[3] to start in the printing trade, and younger brother, Benjamin, became indentured to him.[4] James married Ann Smith, who came from a Puritan family, in 1723, on his 26th birthday. The ceremony, in Boston, was performed by the Rev. John Webb of the New North Church.[5]

Career[edit]

James began publishing the Courant in Boston in 1721 with wife, Ann, and brother, Benjamin, working alongside him. While at the Courant, James gathered a group, referred to by some as "The Hell-Fire Club", for assistance, and introduced "yellow journalism" to Boston.[6] The Courant was considered controversial, and James was imprisoned for four weeks in 1722[7] for writing "scandalous libel".[8] The paper was suppressed in 1727 and they left Boston in the same year.

At the invitation of James's brother, John, a tallow chandler, James and Ann moved to Newport. Here, they had five children, including Mary, Elizabeth, and James Jr. Here, too, James and Ann established the colony's first printing press.[8]

Starting in 1727, James printed and published eight editions of the Rhode-Island Almanack, sometimes under the pseudonym "Poor Robin". They were printed in James' shop near the town schoolhouse, or at his printing-house on Tillinghast's Wharf, near the Union-Flag Tavern. With the assistance of Thomas Fleet, the almanacs were sold as far away as Pudding-Lane in Boston.[8][9]

On September 27, 1732, James published the first issue of the Rhode Island Gazette, 12 inches (30 cm) by 8.5 inches (22 cm) in size. Its run lasted only until May 24, 1733, and its issues were irregular.[3][10]

Later years[edit]

James was ill while living in Newport, but before his death, Benjamin came for a visit. When Benjamin left for Philadelphia, he had with him his nephew, James Jr., and provided him with a printing apprenticeship thereafter.[3] After a long illness, James died in Newport in 1735, on his 38th birthday and 12th wedding anniversary.[11] He was survived by Ann, leaving her with four young children to support alone[12] one child having preceded James in death.

Partial bibliography[edit]

Newspapers
  • —, & Franklin, B. (1721). The New-England courant. Boston [Mass.]: J. Franklin. OCLC 2264838
  • (1732). The Rhode-Island gazette. Newport, R.I.: James Franklin. OCLC 2267192
Almanacs
  • (1727). The Rhode-Island almanack. For the year, 1728. Being bissextile, or leap-year. Carefully fitted, and exact- [sic] calculated to the meridian of Newport on Rhode-Island; whose latitude north is 41 gr. 30 m. longitude from London 72 grs. But may without sensible error, serve all parts of New-England. Being the first ever published for that meridian. OCLC 70091122
  • —, & Fleet, T. (1728). The Rhode-Island almanack, for the year, 1729.: ... Carefully fitted, and exactly calculated to the meridian of Newport on Rhode Island; whose latitude north is 41 gr. 30 m. longitude from London, 72 grs. But may without sensible error serve all parts of New-England.
  • (1729). The Rhode-Island almanack, for the year, 1730. Being the second year after leap year. Carefully fitted, and exactly calculated to the meridian of Newport on Rhode-Island, whose latitude north is 41 gr. 30 m. longitude from London, 72 grs. But may without sensible error serve all parts of New-England. OCLC 62819621
  • (1730). A Perpetual almanack: Shewing, the prime, epact, cycle of the sun, dominical letter, moon's age, high water, day of the month, day of the week, what days of the month all the Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, &c. in any month of any year, fall on, leap year, moon's southing, sun rise, sun set, length of day, length of night, moveable and fixed feasts of the Church of England, and remarkable days for ever, &c. OCLC 62872886
  • (1731). The Rhode-Island almanack, for the year, 1732.: ... Fitted to the meridian of Newport, on Rhode-Island, whose latitude north is 41 gr. 30 m. longitude from London, 72 grs. OCLC 207876015
  • –, & Fleet, T. (1732). The Rhode-Island almanack for the year, 1733.: ... Fitted to the meridian of Newport, on Rhode-Island, whose latitude north is 41 gr. 30 m. longitude from London, 72 grs. OCLC 207876063
  • —, & Fleet, T. (1733). The Rhode-Island almanack for the year, 1734.: ... Fitted to the meridian of Newport, on Rhode-Island, whose latitude north is 41 gr. 30 m. longitude from London, 72 grs. Newport [R.I.]: OCLC 207876120
  • (1734). The Rhode Island almanack for the year, 1735. ... Fitted to the meridian of Newport, on Rhode-Island, whose latitude north is 41 gr. 30 m. longitude from London, 72 grs. Newport [R.I.]: Printed and sold by J. Franklin, at his printing-house under the town school-house. Sold also by T. Fleet, at the Heart and Crown in Cornhill, Boston. OCLC 62819625
Printed by James Franklin in Newport, for the colony of Rhode Island, and sold at his shop near the town schoolhouse
  • (1730). Acts and laws, of His Majesty's Colony of Rhode-Island, and Providence-Plantations, in America. OCLC 5808746
  • (1730). The charter granted by His Majesty King Charles the Second, to the Colony of Rhode Island, and Providence-Plantations, in America. OCLC 191270379
  • (1731). Laws, made and pass'd by the General Assembly of His Majesty's colony of Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations, in New-England,: Held at Newport, on the first Wednesday of May, 1730. OCLC 191270407
Other works
  • (1718). Divine examples of God's severe judgments upon Sabbath breakers, in their unlawful sports, Collected out of several divine subjects, viz. Mr. H.B. Mr. Beard, and the Practice of Piety: a fit monument for our present times, etc. Boston in New-England: Re-printed and sold in Newbury-Street [by Bartholomew Green?]. OCLC 4795117
  • (1722). Hoop-petticoats arraigned and condemned by the light of nature, and law of God. Boston: Printed and sold by James Franklin, in Queen-street. OCLC 7198819
  • (1726). The life and death of Old Father Janus, the vile author of the late wicked Courant A satyr. Boston: Printed and sold by J. Franklin in Union-Street. OCLC 55831518

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fifth Generation". genealogy.com. Retrieved 2008-11-13. 
  2. ^ "1706 Calendar 3". udel.edu. Retrieved 2008-11-13. 
  3. ^ a b c Field, Edward (1902). State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations at the End of the Century: A History. Mason Pub. Co. p. 564. 
  4. ^ "The Story of the New-England Courant Apprenticeship". ushistory.org. Retrieved 2008-11-13. 
  5. ^ "4 Feb, Tuesday". .udel.edu. Retrieved 2008-11-13. 
  6. ^ Franklin, James (1911). The Rhode-Island almanack for the year, 1728. Being the first ever printed in that colony ... reproduced in exact facsimile ... with a brief account of James Franklin the printer .... Providence, R.I.: John Carter Brown library. p. 6. OCLC 68137848. 
  7. ^ Wroth, Lawrence C. (1995). The Colonial Printer. Courier Dover Publications. p. 22. ISBN 0-486-28294-5. 
  8. ^ a b c Mays, Dorothy A. (2004). Women in Early America: Struggle, Survival, and Freedom in a New World. Santa Barbara, Calif: ABC-CLIO. pp. 148–149. ISBN 1-85109-429-6. 
  9. ^ Hammett, Charles Edward (1887). A Contribution to the Bibliography and Literature of Newport, R. I.: Comprising a List of Books Published Or Printed, in Newport, with Notes and Additions. Newport, R.I.: C.E. Hammett, jun. pp. 8–9. OCLC 3288133. 
  10. ^ The National cyclopaedia of American biography Being the history of the United States as illustrated in the lives of the founders, builders, and defenders of the Republic. New York: J.T. White. 1898. p. 17. OCLC 19333907. 
  11. ^ Fleming, Arline A. "Ann Franklin (1696-1763)". projo.com. Retrieved 2008-11-11. 
  12. ^ Davidson, Rebecca W. (2004-02-16). "Ann Smith Franklin". Princeton University Library. Retrieved 2008-11-11. 

External links[edit]