James Garth Marshall

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

James Garth Marshall (20 February 1802 - 22 October 1873) was an English Liberal Party politician, the Member of Parliament for Leeds (1847–1852).[1] He was the third son of the wealthy industrialist John Marshall who introduced major innovations in flax spinning and built the celebrated Marshall's Mill and Temple Works in Leeds, West Yorkshire.[2] His eldest brother William was MP for Beverley,[3] Carlisle[4] and East Cumberland[5] and his next eldest brother, John, was an earlier MP for Leeds.[1] The fourth brother, Henry Cowper, was Mayor of Leeds in 1842-1843.[2]

Marshall bought the Monk Coniston estate, near Coniston, Cumbria, from the Knott family in 1835.[6] He later created the celebrated landscape of Tarn Hows by constructing a dam to merge three existing small tarns into the present body of water, at the same time supplying water power to his sawmill in Yewdale.[7] The estate was later bought by Beatrix Potter and eventually passed to the National Trust.[6]

James Garth Marshall wrote a pamphlet entitled Minorities and Majorities; Their Relative Rights. A Letter to Lord John Russell, M.P. on Parliamentary Reform.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "House of Commons constituencies beginning with "L": Leeds". Leigh Rayment's Peerage Page. Retrieved 2008-07-17. 
  2. ^ a b Gilleghan, John (2001). "Marshall, John". Leeds: A to Z of local history. Kingsway Press. pp. 166–167. ISBN 0-9519194-3-1. 
  3. ^ "House of Commons constituencies beginning with "B": Beverley". Leigh Rayment's Peerage Page. Retrieved 2008-07-17. 
  4. ^ "House of Commons constituencies beginning with "C": Carlisle (Cumberland)". Leigh Rayment's Peerage Page. Retrieved 2008-07-17. 
  5. ^ "House of Commons constituencies beginning with "C": Cumberland East". Leigh Rayment's Peerage Page. Retrieved 2008-07-17. 
  6. ^ a b "Coniston and Tarn Hows: a brief history". National Trust. Retrieved 2008-07-17. 
  7. ^ "Tarn Hows - Lake District". Landscape Images. Retrieved 2008-07-17. 
  8. ^ See Marshall, James Garth (1854). Minorities and Majorities; Their Relative Rights. A Letter to Lord John Russell, M.P. on Parliamentary Reform (2 ed.). London: James Ridgway. Retrieved 21 June 2014.  via Archive.org

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
William Aldam
William Beckett
Member of Parliament for Leeds
1847-1852
With: William Beckett
Succeeded by
Matthew Talbot Baines
George Goodman