James Hendler

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James Alexander Hendler
Prof James Hendler-2008-11-03.JPG
Born (1957-04-02) 2 April 1957 (age 57)
Queens, New York
Residence Albany, New York, USA
Citizenship USA
Nationality USA
Fields Artificial intelligence
Semantic web
Institutions Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Yale University,
Southern Methodist University
Brown University
Alma mater Brown University
Thesis Integrating Marker-Passing and Problem-Solving: A Spreading-Activation Approach to Improved Choice in Planning (1986)
Doctoral advisor Eugene Charniak
Known for Significant Contributions to the Semantic Web[1]
Spouse Terry Horowit
Website
www.cs.rpi.edu/~hendler
twitter.com/jahendler

James Alexander Hendler (born April 2, 1957) is an artificial intelligence researcher at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA, and one of the originators of the Semantic Web.[1]

Education[edit]

Hendler completed his Doctor of Philosophy degree at Brown University in 1986 with a thesis on automated planning and scheduling.[2] He also has an MS (1981) in Cognitive Psychology from Southern Methodist University, a MSc (1983) from Brown University, and a BS (1978) from Yale University.

Research[edit]

Hendler's research interests[3][4] are in the semantic web[1][5] and artificial intelligence.[6][7] Hendler held a longstanding position as professor at the University of Maryland where he was the Director of the Joint Institute for Knowledge Discovery and held joint appointments in the Department of Computer Science, the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies and the Institute for Systems Research. Hendler was the Director for Semantic Web and Agent Technology at the Maryland Information and Network Dynamics Laboratory. He is a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, the British Computer Society, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the AAAS.

On June 14, 2006, James A. Hendler was appointed senior constellation professor of the Tetherless World Research Constellation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and he became a professor at that institute starting on January 1, 2007. Hendler has appointments in Computer and Cognitive Sciences, and served as the Assistant Dean for Information Technology and Web Science from 2009 to 2012. In 2012 he became the Head of the Computer Science Department at RPI and in 2013 he became the Director of the RPI Institute for Data Exploration and Applications.[8]

Hendler helps lead the Tetherless World Constellation on increasing access to information at any time and place without the need for a “tether” to a specific computer or device.[9] Researchers envision an increasingly web-accessible world in which personal digital assistants (PDAs), cameras, music-listening devices, cell phones, laptops, and other technologies converge to offer the user interactive information and communication. Hendler is also one of the directors of the Web Science Trust and a visiting professor at DeMontfort University.

He is also the Editor in Chief Emeritus of IEEE Intelligent Systems and is the first computer scientist to serve on the Board of Reviewing Editors for Science.

He is a former member of the US Air Force Science Advisory Board and a former Chief Scientist of the Information Systems Office at the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). During his tenure there, he was responsible for projects such as CoABS - Control of Agent Based System, which led to the creation of other Agent-based projects: Taskable Agent Software Kit (TASK) and DARPA's Agent Markup Language (DAML) - the latter of which was involved in funding the emerging Semantic Web area.[10]

Hendler also serves as an "Internet Web Expert" for the U.S. government, providing guidance to the Data.gov project,[11] and in September 2013 he was appointed as the Open Data Advisor for NY State.[12]

Hendler was co-author, with Tim Berners-Lee and Ora Lassila, of the article "The Semantic Web" which appeared in Scientific American in 2001.[1]

Books[edit]

Honors[edit]

Boards and advisory boards[edit]

  • Radar Networks, Advisory Board, (sold to EVRI)
  • TopQuadrant, Advisory Board[13]
  • Franz Inc, Advisory Board
  • Recursion Inc, Advisory Board
  • Open Data Registry, Advisory Board
  • Bright Hub, Advisory Board
  • SocialWire, Advisory Board

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Berners-Lee, T.; Hendler, J.; Lassila, O. (2001). "The Semantic Web". Scientific American 2841 (5): 34. doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0501-34.  edit
  2. ^ Hendler, James (1986). Integrating Marker-Passing and Problem-Solving: A Spreading-Activation Approach to Improved Choice in Planning (PhD thesis). Brown University. 
  3. ^ List of publications from Google Scholar
  4. ^ List of publications from the DBLP Bibliography Server
  5. ^ Hendler, J. (2001). "Agents and the Semantic Web". IEEE Intelligent Systems 16 (2): 30–37. doi:10.1109/5254.920597.  edit
  6. ^ Sirin, E.; Parsia, B.; Wu, D.; Hendler, J.; Nau, D. (2004). "HTN planning for Web Service composition using SHOP2". Web Semantics: Science, Services and Agents on the World Wide Web 1 (4): 377. doi:10.1016/j.websem.2004.06.005.  edit
  7. ^ Wu, D.; Parsia, B.; Sirin, E.; Hendler, J.; Nau, D. (2003). "Automating DAML-S Web Services Composition Using SHOP2". The Semantic Web - ISWC 2003. Lecture Notes in Computer Science 2870. p. 195. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-39718-2_13. ISBN 978-3-540-20362-9.  edit
  8. ^ http://news.rpi.edu/content/2013/06/13/rensselaer-idea-harnessing-power-data-change-world
  9. ^ "RPI Press Release". 
  10. ^ "The W3C's proposal for the development of the Semantic Web under DARPA'S DAML Research Program". 
  11. ^ "Data.gov Community Page". 
  12. ^ http://www.governor.ny.gov/press/09202013-open-data-special-advisors
  13. ^ http://www.topquadrant.com