James Iver McKay

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James Iver McKay (1793–1853) was a Congressional Representative from North Carolina; born near Elizabethtown, North Carolina, in 1793; pursued classical studies; studied law; was admitted to the bar and practiced; appointed United States attorney for the district of North Carolina on March 6, 1817; served in the State senate 1815–1819, 1822, 1826, and 1830; elected as a Jacksonian to the Twenty-second through Twenty-fourth Congresses and as a Democrat to the Twenty-fifth through Thirtieth Congresses (March 4, 1831 – March 3, 1849); chairman, Committee on Military Affairs (Twenty-fifth Congress), Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads (Twenty-sixth Congress), Committee on Expenditures in the Department of War (Twenty-seventh Congress), Ways and Means Committee (Twenty-eighth and Twenty-ninth Congresses). The favorite son of the North Carolina delegation at the 1848 Democratic Convention for Vice President; McKay died in Goldsboro, North Carolina, September 4, 1853.

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United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Edward B. Dudley
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from North Carolina's 5th congressional district

1831 – 1843
Succeeded by
Romulus M. Saunders
Preceded by
Archibald H. Arrington
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from North Carolina's 6th congressional district

1843 – 1847
Succeeded by
John Daniel
Preceded by
John Daniel
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from North Carolina's 7th congressional district

1847 – 1849
Succeeded by
William S. Ashe