James Joseph Walsh

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James Joseph Walsh, M.D., Ph.D.

James Joseph Walsh, M.D., LL.D., Litt.D., Sc.D. (1865–1942)[1] was an American physician and author, born in New York City. He graduated from Fordham College in 1884 (Ph. D., 1892) and from the University of Pennsylvania (M.D.) in 1895. After postgraduate work in Paris, Vienna and Berlin he settled in New York. Doctor Walsh was for many years Dean and Professor of nervous diseases and of the history of medicine at Fordham University school of medicine.

In addition to contributing to the New International Encyclopedia and to medical and other journals, he also published a variety of popular works.[2]

Works[edit]

Articles[edit]

Miscellany[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Dr. James J. Walsh is Honored at Rites; Archbishop Spellman Presides at Mass for Physician, Author," The New York Times, March 5, 1942.
  2. ^ Mcnamara, Pat. "James J. Walsh, Neurologist and Medievalist," Patheos, February 28, 2009.
  3. ^ MacCallum, W. G. "Makers of Modern Medicine," Science, New Series, Vol. 26, No. 660, 1907.
  4. ^ Roosevelt, Theodore. "Education: How Old the New," The Outlook, April 8, 1911.
  5. ^ Colby, Elbridge. "Shakespeare and Catholicism," The Ecclesiastical Review, Vol. LV, 1916.
  6. ^ "Safeguarding Children's Nerves: A Handbook of Mental Hygiene," The Saturday Review, June 20, 1925.
  7. ^ Shryock, Richard H. "Mother Alphonsa, Rose Hawthorne Lathrop by James Joseph Walsh," The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 17(4), March 1931.

Further reading[edit]

  • Gronberger, Sven Magnus. St. Bridget of Sweden; a Chapter of Mediaeval Church History, Publications of the Writers Club of Washington, Vol. 1(2), 1917.
  • Kirwin, Harry W. James J. Walsh - Medical Historian and Pathfinder, The Catholic Historical Review, Vol. 45(4), January, 1960.
  • McGuire, Constantine E. Catholic Builders of the Nation; a Symposium on the Catholic Contribution to the Civilization of the United States, Catholic Book Company, 1935.

External links[edit]