James Ley, 1st Earl of Marlborough

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James Ley, 1st Earl of Marlborough.

James Ley, 1st Earl of Marlborough (ca. 1552–1629) was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1597 and 1622. He was Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench in Ireland and then in England and was Lord High Treasurer from 1624 to 1628. On 31 December 1624, James I created him Baron Ley, of Ley in the County of Devon, and on 5 February 1626, Charles I created him Earl of Marlborough. Both titles became extinct upon the death of the 4th Earl of Marlborough in 1679.

Early life[edit]

James Ley was a younger son of a the soldier and landowner Henry Ley (died 1574), of Teffont Evias, Wiltshire, where he was born in about 1552.[1] He attended both Cambridge and Oxford Universities, graduating from Brasenose College in 1574.[2] He then trained as a barrister, becoming a bencher of Lincolns Inn and reader of Furnival's Inn.

Public service[edit]

Ley was elected as Member of Parliament for Westbury in 1597. In 1603, he was appointed a judge on the Carmarthen circuit in June 1603. That November he became a serjeant at law and in December James I knighted him. He was elected MP for Westbury again in 1604, and then King James sent him to Dublin as Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench for Ireland. He also served on the Privy Council of Ireland. Amongst other things, he caused the English Book of Common Prayer to be translated into Irish, and sought to enforce Protestant church attendance on Irish lords.

Ley was called back to England in 1608, ostensibly to brief the English Privy Council on the settlement of Ulster. He was then appointed to the lucrative post of Attorney-General of the Court of Wards. Further promotion came slowly. He was member of Parliament for Westbury again in 1609–10 and was elected MP for Bath in 1614. He was made a baronet in 1619. In 1621 he was made an English judge at Westminster, when he became Lord Chief Justice. He was elected MP for Westbury again in 1621, but was required to preside in the House of Lords following the disgrace of Francis Bacon, though he was not made Lord Chancellor.

Late in 1624, Ley replaced Cranfield as Lord High Treasurer, also being sworn as a Privy Councillor. He was created Baron Ley, and then in 1626 Earl of Marlborough. His treasurership was a difficult one due to Charles I's financial difficulties. He retired from this in 1628, and from July 1628 until December 1628 he was Lord President of the Council. However he soon retired to Lincolns Inn and died the following March.

Other achievements[edit]

Ley was a founder member of the Society of Antiquaries. None of his works on legal or antiquarian subjects were published in his lifetime, but his grandson James Ley, 3rd Earl of Marlborough arranged for the publication of his treatise on wardship in 1642, and a collection of law reports in 1659. Four of his papers to the Society of Antiquaries were published by Thomas Hearne in his Collection of Curious Discourses (1720).

Family[edit]

Ley married Mary Pettie, of Stoke Talmage, Oxfordshire, by whom he had two sons and eight daughters, including the poet Lady Hester Pulter.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Anthony Wood, Athenae Oxoniensis, vol. 2 (1692), p. 487 online
  2. ^ "Ley, James (LY571J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 

References[edit]

Parliament of England
Preceded by
William Jordyn
Henry Fanshawe
Member of Parliament for Westbury
1597
With: Matthew Ley
Succeeded by
Matthew Ley
Henry Jackman
Preceded by
Matthew Ley
Henry Jackman
Member of Parliament for Westbury
1604
With: Matthew Ley
Succeeded by
Matthew Ley
Alexander Choke
Preceded by
William Sharestone
Christopher Stone
Member of Parliament for Bath
1614
With: Nicholas Hyde
Succeeded by
Sir Robert Phelips
Sir Robert Pye
Preceded by
Matthew Ley
Henry Ley
Member of Parliament for Westbury
1621–1622
With: Sir Miles Fleetwood
Succeeded by
Sir John Saye
Henry Mildmay
Legal offices
Preceded by
Robert Gardiner
Lord Chief Justice of Ireland
1604–1608
Succeeded by
Humphrey Winch
Preceded by
Sir Henry Montagu
Lord Chief Justice
1621–1625
Succeeded by
Ranulph Crewe
Political offices
Preceded by
Earl of Middlesex
Lord High Treasurer
1624–1628
Succeeded by
Earl of Portland
Preceded by
The Earl of Manchester
Lord President of the Council
1628
Succeeded by
The Viscount Conway
Peerage of England
New creation Earl of Marlborough
1st creation
1626–1629
Succeeded by
Henry Ley
Baron Ley
(descended by acceleration)

1624–1628