James Lorimer (advocate)

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James Lorimer (4 November 1818 – 13 February 1890) was a Scottish advocate and professor of public law.

Life[edit]

Lorimer was born in Aberdalgie in Perthshire.

He was admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in 1845. He became Regius Professor of Public Law at the University of Edinburgh in 1862,[1] a post he retained until his death.

Lorimer first rented Kellie Castle in 1878 and it became the family home. His children included the painter John Henry Lorimer and the architect Sir Robert Lorimer.

A plaque in his memory is situated at the entrance to the Law Faculty at the University of Edinburgh.[2]

Works[edit]

Lorimer's publications include The Institutes of Law: a Treatise of the Principles of Jurisprudence as Determined by Nature (1872)[3] and The Institutes of the Law of Nations: a Treatise of the Jural Relations of Separate Political Communities (two volumes, 1884).[4][5]

His legal philosophy was one of Natural law that stood against the prevailing Legal positivism.[1]

His concerns with the application of natural law to international relations were particularly influential in formalising the forms of inter-state recognition in 19th century continental Europe.[6] In 1873 he was one of the founders of the Institut de Droit International.

Family[edit]

Lorimer was the father of both the noted architect, Sir Robert Lorimer, and the famous painter, John Henry Lorimer.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Overview of James Lorimer". Gazetteer of Scotland. Retrieved 2009-07-28. 
  2. ^ "Millennial Plaques". University of Edinburgh. Retrieved 2009-07-28. 
  3. ^ See Lorimer, James (1880). The Institutes of Law: a Treatise of the Principles of Jurisprudence as Determined by Nature (2 ed.). Edinburgh & London: William Blackwood & Sons. Retrieved 7 July 2014.  via Archive.org
  4. ^ See Lorimer, James (1883). The Institutes of the Law of Nations: a Treatise of the Jural Relations of Separate Political Communities 1 (1 ed.). Edinburgh & London: William Blackwood & Sons. Retrieved 7 July 2014.  via Archive.org
  5. ^ See Lorimer, James (1884). The Institutes of the Law of Nations: a Treatise of the Jural Relations of Separate Political Communities 2 (1 ed.). Edinburgh & London: William Blackwood & Sons. Retrieved 7 July 2014.  via Archive.org
  6. ^ Schmitt, Carl. The Nomos of the Earth. Telos Press. p. 304. ISBN 0-914386-30-1.