James M. Bower

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James Mason Bower (born February 17, 1954 in Northampton, Massachusetts, USA) is an American neuroscientist and CEO and Chairman of the Board of Numedeon Inc., creator of the Whyville.net educational virtual world. He graduated from McQuaid Jesuit High School in Rochester, New York attending Antioch College and Montana State University as an undergraduate and then received his PhD in neurophysiology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, U.S. in 1982. He was a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Rodolfo Llinas at NYU School of Medicine and the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts and then took a faculty position at the California Institute of Technology where he was promoted to Professor of Computational Neuroscience. Since 2002 he has held the position of Professor of Computational Biology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and the University of Texas at San Antonio Since 1999, Dr. Bower has been CEO and Chairman of the Board of Numedeon Inc, founders of Whyville.net Whyville. Dr. Bower is also a member of Monitor Talent of Monitor Group.

Scientific Research[edit]

His core scientific research involves computational studies designed to uncover structure / function relations in cortical structures of the mammalian brain, including both those associated with the olfactory system, and the cerebellum.[1] His laboratory uses a wide range of experimental and model based techniques and has pioneered the use of realistic modeling techniques in computational neuroscience,.[2] Dr. Bower's former students are now found in scientific institutions around the world [3]

Scientific Infrastructure[edit]

He has also been involved in numerous science infrastructure efforts, including establishing and maintaining the GENESIS (software) simulation system, founding and directing for its first 5 years the Methods in Computational Neuroscience Course at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA.,[4] starting the European Union's Methods in Computational Neuroscience Course, and also was involved in organizing the Latin American Course for Computational Neuroscience (LASCON). He was also one of the founding editors of the Journal of Computational Neuroscience, and the Annual International Meeting in Computational Neuroscience which he directed from 1991 to 2001 and again in 2010.[5]

Efforts in Education[edit]

Dr. Bower has also been involved in educational reform efforts since he was President of the Teen League of Rochester (NY) as a high school student from 1970 - 1971. While at Caltech, he founded and directed the Caltech Precollege Science Initiative (CAPSI). He has been a member of numerous national advisory groups on education, including within the National Research Council of the National Academy of Science, the National Science Foundation and the Society for Neuroscience. He is regarded as one of the leading innovators in on-line game based learning and education.[6][7][8]

Business efforts[edit]

Dr. Bower is CEO and Chairman of the Board of Numedeon Inc. a company he founded in 1998 to develop educationally related virtual worlds. The company's flagship effort, Whyville.net is now one of the largest education sites for young adults on the World Wide Web, with a player base of more than 7 million.[9] Whyville has been particularly successful in attracting young teens.[10] Whyville continues to be one of the leading sites for innovation in game-based learning design [11][12]

Publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Purkinje cell model". YouTube Video. 2007-12-25. Retrieved 2007-12-25. 
  2. ^ "Who's News: Renowned Computational Neurobiologist James Bower Joins Research Imaging Center". The News. 2002-03-22. Retrieved 2007-07-06. 
  3. ^ "Bower Academic Lineage". Neuro-tree. 2013-07-31. 
  4. ^ MBL (2013-06-22). "History of the Marine Biological Laboratory". Methods in Computational Neuroscience Course History. 
  5. ^ James M. Bower (2013-06-22). "20 Years of Computational Neuroscience". 20 Years of Computational Neuroscience. 
  6. ^ Connie Yowell (2009-10-01). "Whyville - Video for NRC". Interview with Connie Yowell, director of education at the MacArthur Foundation. Retrieved 2009-10-01. 
  7. ^ Heather Chaplin (2013-07-09). "Q&A: James Bower on Good Game Design and Learning". MacArthur Foundation Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning. Retrieved 2013-07-09. 
  8. ^ James M. Bower (2011-11-27). "Whyville and Virtual World Learning". 140 Conference. 
  9. ^ Cliff Zintgraff (2013-02-06). "THE WHYPOWER PROJECT: CROSSING GAMES TO STANDARDS". Next Generation Learning Challenges. 
  10. ^ Michelle Thaller (2002-08-16). "Whyville: the place girls love to go for science". The Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved 2002-08-16. 
  11. ^ Heather Chaplin (2013-07-09). "Q&A: James Bower on Good Game Design and Learning". MacArthur Foundation Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning. Retrieved 2013-07-09. 
  12. ^ Connie Yowell (2009-10-01). "Whyville - Video for NRC". Interview with Connie Yowell, director of education at the MacArthur Foundation. Retrieved 2009-10-01. 

External links[edit]