James Ormsbee Chapin

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James Ormsbee Chapin (9 July 1887 - 12 July 1975) was an American painter and illustrator.

Chapin was born in West Orange, New Jersey, to James A. Chapin and Delia I Rysler.[1] He studied at Cooper Union, the Art Students League of New York, and abroad at the Royal Academy of Antwerp, Belgium.[2] Early in his career he won the Teminstitutions such as The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (where he taught portraiture), The Phillips Collection, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Newark Museum, Amherst College, The Dallas Museum of Art, Texas; The Asheville Art Museum, The Currier Gallery of Art, The Five College Museums Collections, The Harvard Art Museums, and The Indianapolis Museum of Art.[3] Chapin had a significant impact on the early history of Regionalists Thomas Hart Benton, John Steuart Curry, and Grant Wood with his 1920's series of portraits of the Marvin family.[4]

Chapin met Mary Fischer while teaching in California in the late 1930s. He was the father of jazz musician Jim Chapin and grandfather of folk singer Harry Chapin.

Largely due to his opposition to United States foreign policy in Southeast Asia, he moved to Canada in 1969, and died in Toronto in 1975.[5]

References[edit]

  • Anderson, Sherman Reed "James Ormsbee Chapin and the Marvin Paintings: An Epic of the American Farm" University of Kansas, 2008.
  • Chapin, James. "The Seven Ages of a Physician: A Series of Seven Paintings" Ciba Pharmaceutical Products, Inc, 1943.
  • Eldredge, Charles C. "Tales from the Easel: American Narrative Paintings from Southeastern Museums, circa 1800-1950" University of Georgia Press, 2004.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ James A. Chapin and Delia I Rysler
  2. ^ Eldredge, p. 96.
  3. ^ Chapin.
  4. ^ Anderson.
  5. ^ Eldredge, p. 96.

External links[edit]